Kinh Giải Bệnh Girimānanda - The Discourse concerning Girimānanda (Song ngữ Vietnamese-English)

24/09/20224:10 SA(Xem: 792)
Kinh Giải Bệnh Girimānanda - The Discourse concerning Girimānanda (Song ngữ Vietnamese-English)
THE DISCOURSE CONCERNING GIRIMĀNANDA
KINH GIẢI BỆNH GIRIMĀNANDA
PDF icon (4)Kinh Giải Bệnh Girimānanda

kinh giai benhGirimānanda Sutta (AN 10.60) Kinh Giải Bệnh Girimānanda from Aṅguttara Nikāya Dasakanipātapāḷi (A.10.2.1.10, book 3 page 342-345)

This sutta is also quite famous when it comes to helping someone who is sick. In Myanmar, this sutta is very commonly recited for the curing of diseases.

Bài kinh này cũng khá nổi tiếng liên quan đến việc giúp đỡ những ai bị bệnh. Ở Myanmar, bài kinh này rất thường được tụng đọc cho việc điều trị các bệnh tật.

The Discourse concerning Girimānanda Kinh Giải Bệnh Girimānanda

One day, the Blessed One was staying in the Jetavana monastery. A bhikkhu by the name of Girimānanda was sick. The Blessed One taught Venerable Ānanda this sutta in order to be recited in front of that bhikkhu who was sick.

Một ngày nọ, Đức Thế Tôn đang ngụ ở Tịnh xá Kỳ Viên Jetavana. Một Tỳ khưu tên Girimānanda lâm bệnh. Đức Thế Tôn dạy cho Tôn Giả Ānanda bài kinh này để tụng đọc trước vị Tỳ Khưu bị bệnh ấy.

So, what are the main contents or teachings in this Girimānanda Sutta?

The Buddha taught the following ten perceptions.

Vậy, nội dung hay lời dạy chủ yếu trong bài Kinh Giải Bệnh Girimānanda này là gì? Đức Phật Buddha đã dạy mười pháp quán tưởng sau đây:


Nguyên văn bản tiếng Anh: (download bản song ngữ PDF bên trên)

THE DISCOURSE CONCERNING GIRIMĀNANDA
(Girimānanda sutta, Aṅg 10:60)

The Discourse to Girimānanda

Thus I heard:

At one time the Fortunate One was dwelling near Sāvatthī at Anāthapiṇḍika’s grounds in Jeta’s Wood.

Then at that time venerable Girimānanda was afflicted, suffering, and very sick.

Then venerable Ānanda approached the Fortunate One, and after approaching and worshipping the Fortunate One, he sat down on one side.

While sitting on one side venerable Ānanda said this to the Fortunate One:

“Reverend Sir, venerable Girimānanda is afflicted, suffering, and very sick. Please, reverend Sir, may the Fortunate One approach venerable Girimānanda, taking pity on him.”

“If you, Ānanda, having approached the monk Girimānanda, were to recite 10 perceptions, then it is possible that having heard the 10 perceptions, the monk Girimānanda’s affliction would immediately abate.

What are the 10?

  1. The perception of impermanence,
  2. the perception of non-self,
  3. the perception of the unattractive,
  4. the perception of danger,
  5. the perception of giving up,
  6. the perception of dispassion,
  7. the perception of cessation,
  8. the perception of non-delight in the whole world,
  9. the perception of impermanence in all processes,
  10. mindfulness while breathing.

1. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of impermanence?

Here, Ānanda, a monk who has gone to the wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty place, considers thus:

  1. form is impermanent
  2. feelings are impermanent
  3. perceptions are impermanent
  4. (mental) processes are impermanent
  5. consciousness is impermanent.

Thus in regard to these 5 constituents (of mind and body) he dwells contemplating impermanence.

This, Ānanda, is called the perception of impermanence.


2. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of non-self?

Here, Ānanda, a monk who has gone to the wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty place, considers thus:

  1. the eye is not self - forms are not self
  2. the ear is not self - sounds are not self
  3. the nose is not self - smells are not self
  4. the tongue is not self - tastes are not self
  5. the body is not self - tangibles are not self
  6. the mind is not self - thoughts are not self.

Thus in regard to these 6 internal and external sense spheres he dwells contemplating non-self.

This, Ānanda, is called the perception of non-self.


3. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of the unattractive?

Here, Ānanda, a monk (in regard to) this body - from the sole of the feet upwards, from the hair of the head down, bounded by the skin, and filled with manifold impurities - reflects (thus):

There are in this body:

head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skin,
flesh, sinews, bones, bone-marrow, kidneys,
heart, liver, pleura, spleen, lungs,
intestines, mesentery, undigested food, excrement,
 bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat,
tears, grease, spit, mucus, synovial fluid, urine.

Thus in regard to this body he dwells contemplating what is unattractive.

This, Ānanda, is called the perception of the unattractive.


4. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of danger?

Here, Ānanda, a monk who has gone to the wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty place, considers thus:

This body has many sufferings, many dangers, thus, in connection with this body, various afflictions arise, like this:

eye-disease, ear-disease, nose-disease, tongue-disease, body-disease,
head-disease, ear-disease, mouth-disease, tooth-disease,
cough, asthma, catarrh, pyrexia, fever,
stomach-ache, fainting, diarrhoea, gripes, cholera,
leprosy, boils, eczema, consumption, epilepsy,
ringworm, itch, scab, chickenpox, scabies,
haemorrhage, diabetes, piles, cancer, ulcers,

afflictions arising from excess bile,
afflictions arising from excess phlegm,
afflictions arising from excess wind,
afflictions arising from a conflict of humours,
afflictions born of a change of season,
afflictions born of not being careful,
afflictions from being attacked,
afflictions born as a result of (previous unwholesome) actions, cold, heat, hunger, thirst, stool, urine.

Thus, in regard to this body, he dwells contemplating danger.

This, Ānanda, is called the perception of danger.


5. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of giving up?

Here, Ānanda, a monk does not consent to thoughts of sense desire that have arisen, (these) he gives up, dispels, brings to an end, and makes non-existent.

He does not consent to thoughts of ill-will that have arisen,
(these) he gives up, dispels, brings to an end, and makes non-existent.

He does not consent to thoughts of violence that have arisen,
(these) he gives up, dispels, brings to an end, and makes non-existent.

He does not consent to any bad, unwholesome, thoughts that have arisen,
(these) he gives up, dispels, brings to an end, and makes non-existent.

This, Ānanda, is called the perception of giving up.


6. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of dispassion?

Here, Ānanda, a monk who has gone to the wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty place, considers thus:

 This is peaceful, this is excellent,

that is to say:

  1. the calming of all processes,
  2. the letting go of all bases for cleaving,
  3. the end of craving,
  4. dispassion,
  5. Nibbāna.

This, Ānanda, is called the perception of dispassion.


7. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of cessation?

Here, Ānanda, a monk who has gone to the wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty place, considers thus:

This is peaceful, this is excellent,

that is to say:

  1. the calming of all processes,
  2. the letting go of all bases for cleaving,
  3. the end of craving,
  4. dispassion,
  5. Nibbāna.

This, Ānanda, is called the perception of cessation.


8. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of non-delight in the whole world?

Here, Ānanda, a monk in regard to whatever in the world are selfish means and attachments, or mental determinations, settled beliefs, and tendencies, giving these up, not being attached, he abstains (from them).

This, Ānanda, is the perception of non-delight in the whole world.


9. Now what, Ānanda, is the perception of impermanence in all processes?

Here, Ānanda, a monk in regard to all processes is distressed, ashamed, and disgusted.

This, Ānanda, is the perception of impermanence in all processes.


10. Now what, Ānanda, is mindfulness while breathing?

Here, Ānanda, a monk who has gone to the wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty place, sits down.

After folding his legs crosswise, setting his body straight, and establishing mindfulness at the front, ever mindful he breathes in, mindful he breathes out.

While breathing in long, he knows “I am breathing in long”,
while breathing out long, he knows “I am breathing out long”,
while breathing in short, he knows “I am breathing in short”,
while breathing out short, he knows “I am breathing out short”,

he trains like this: experiencing the whole body I will breathe in,
he trains like this: experiencing the whole body I will breathe out,
he trains like this: making the bodily process calm I will breathe in,
he trains like this: making the bodily process calm I will breathe out.

He trains like this: experiencing joy I will breathe in,
he trains like this: experiencing joy I will breathe out,
he trains like this: experiencing pleasure I will breathe in,
he trains like this: experiencing pleasure I will breathe out,

he trains like this: experiencing the mental process I will breathe in,
he trains like this: experiencing the mental process I will breathe out,
he trains like this: making the mental process calm I will breathe in,
he trains like this: making the mental process calm I will breathe out.

He trains like this: experiencing the mind I will breathe in,
he trains like this: experiencing the mind I will breathe out,
he trains like this: gladdening the mind I will breathe in,
he trains like this: gladdening the mind I will breathe out,

he trains like this: concentrating the mind I will breathe in,
he trains like this: concentrating the mind I will breathe out,
he trains like this: freeing the mind I will breathe in,
he trains like this: freeing the mind I will breathe out.

He trains like this: contemplating impermanence I will breathe in,
he trains like this: contemplating impermanence I will breathe out,
he trains like this: contemplating dispassion I will breathe in,
he trains like this: contemplating dispassion I will breathe out,

he trains like this: contemplating cessation I will breathe in,
he trains like this: contemplating cessation I will breathe out,
he trains like this: contemplating letting go I will breathe in,
he trains like this: contemplating letting go I will breathe out.

This, Ānanda, is mindfulness while breathing.

If you, Ānanda, having approached the monk Girimānanda, were to recite these 10 perceptions, then it is possible that having heard the 10 perceptions, the monk Girimānanda’s affliction would immediately abate.”

Then venerable Ānanda, having learned these 10 perceptions from the Fortunate One, approached venerable Girimānanda, and after approaching he recited these 10 perceptions to venerable Girimānanda. Then, having heard these 10 perceptions, venerable Girimānanda’s affliction immediately abated, and venerable Girimānanda arose from that affliction, and by that venerable Girimānanda’s affliction was brought to an end.

(https://buddhism.redzambala.com/anguttara-nikaya/dasakanipata/girimananda-sutta-10-60.html)

Một bản dịch tiếng Anh khác:

Aṅguttara NikāyaAN 10.60 Girimānanda Sutta
Discourse to Girimānanda Thera

The monk Girimānanda listens to a teaching that helps him overcome his illness.

Thus have I heard: On one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Sāvatthi, at Jetavana, at Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. And on that occasion Venerable Girimānanda was afflicted with a disease, was suffering physically, and was gravely ill. Then Venerable Ānanda went to the Blessed One, Paid homage to the Blessed One and sat down to one side.

As he was sitting there Venerable Ānanda said to the Blessed One: Oh Bhante, the Venerable Girimānanda is afflicted with a disease, is suffering physically, and is gravely ill. It would be good if the Blessed One would visit the Venerable Girimānanda, out of compassion for him.

Ānanda, if you go to the monk Girimānanda and explain to him the ten perceptions, it is possible that having heard the ten perceptions, he will be cured of his illness.

Which ten perceptions? The perception of impermanence, the perception of non-self, the perception of unattractiveness, the perception of danger, the perception of abandoning, the perception of dispassion, the perception of cessation, the perception of non-delight in the entire world, the perception of the impermanence of all formations, and mindfulness of in and out breathing.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of impermanence? Herein, Ānanda, a monk having gone to the forest, to the shade of a tree, or to a secluded place, wisely reflects thus: form is impermanent, feeling is impermanent, perception is impermanent, formations are impermanent, consciousness is impermanent. Thus he dwells contemplating the impermanence of the five aggregates of clinging. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of impermanence.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of non-self? Herein, Ānanda, a monk having gone to the forest, to the shade of a tree, or to a secluded place, wisely reflects thus: the eye is non-self, forms are non-self; the ear is non-self, sounds are non-self; the nose is non-self, smells are non-self; the tongue is non-self, flavors are non-self; the body is non-self, tangibles are non-self; the mind is non-self, thoughts are non-self. Thus he dwells contemplating non-self with regard to the six internal and external faculties. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of non-self.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of unattractiveness? Herein, Ānanda, a monk contemplates this body, upwards from the soles of the feet, and downwards from the tips of the hairs, enclosed in skin, and filled with many kinds of impurities. There are, in this body: head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, membranes, spleen, lungs, small intestines, large intestines, stomach, excrement, bile, phlegm, puss, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus, oil in the joints, and urine. Thus he dwells contemplating unattractiveness in this body. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of unattractiveness.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of danger? Herein, Ānanda, a monk, having gone to the forest, to the shade of a tree, or to a secluded place, wisely reflects thus: many are the sufferings, many are the dangers associated with this body. In this body many kinds of illnesses arise, such as, eye illnesses, ear illnesses, nose illnesses, tongue illnesses, body illnesses, head illnesses, outer-ear illnesses, mouth illnesses, teeth illnesses, cough, asthma, catarrh, heart-burn, fever, stomach-ache, fainting, dysentery, gripes, cholera, leprosy, boils, scrofula, tuberculosis, epilepsy, skin diseases, itch, scab, chickenpox, scabies, jaundice, diabetes, paralysis, cancer, fistula; illnesses arising from disorder of bile, illnesses arising from disorder of phlegm, illnesses arising from disorder of wind, illnesses arising from combinations of bodily humors, illnesses arising from changes of the climate, illnesses arising from careless bodily behaviour, illnesses arising from attacks, illnesses arising from the result of kamma; cold, heat, hunger, thirst, defecation, and urination. Thus he dwells contemplating the danger in this body. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of danger.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of abandoning? Herein, Ānanda, a monk does not tolerate an arisen sensual thought. He abandons it, destroys it, dispels it, terminates it, and obliterates it. He does not tolerate an arisen thought of ill-will. He abandons it, destroys it, dispels it, terminates it, and obliterates it. He does not tolerate an arisen thought of harming. He abandons it, destroys it, dispels it, terminates it, and obliterates it. He does not tolerate any arisen evil, unwholesome thoughts. He abandons them, destroys them, dispels them, terminates them, and obliterates them. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of abandoning.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of dispassion? Herein, Ānanda, a monk, having gone to the forest, to the shade of a tree, or to a secluded place, wisely reflects thus: this is peaceful, this is sublime, that is, the stilling of all formations, the relinquishment of all acquisitions, the destruction of craving, dispassion, Nibbāna. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of dispassion.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of cessation? Herein, Ānanda, a monk, having gone to the forest, to the shade of a tree, or to a secluded place, wisely reflects thus: this is peaceful, this is sublime, that is, the stilling of all formations, the relinquishment of all acquisitions, the destruction of craving, cessation, Nibbāna. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of cessation.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of non-delight in the entire world? Herein, Ānanda, a monk refrains from any engagement and clinging, mental standpoints, adherences, and underlying tendencies in regards to the world of aggregates, elements, and sense bases. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of non-delight in the entire world.

And what, Ānanda, is the perception of the impermanence of all formations? Herein, Ānanda, a monk is repelled, humiliated, and disgusted with all formations. This, Ānanda, is called the perception of the impermanence of all formations.

And what, Ānanda, is mindfulness of in and out breathing? Herein, Ānanda, a monk, having gone to the forest, to the shade of a tree, or to a secluded place, sits down folding his legs crosswise, holding his body straight, and setting mindfulness on breathing.

Mindful he breathes in, mindful he breathes out.

When he is breathing in a long breath, he knows, ‘I am breathing in a long breath.’ When he is breathing out a long breath, he knows, ‘I am breathing out a long breath.’

When he is breathing in a short breath, he knows, ‘I am breathing in a short breath.’ When he is breathing out a short breath, he knows, ‘I am breathing out a short breath.’

‘Conscious of the entire breathing process, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Conscious of the entire breathing process, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Calming the entire breathing process, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Calming the entire breathing process, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Experiencing rapture, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Experiencing rapture, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Experiencing pleasure, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Experiencing pleasure, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Experiencing the mental formations, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Experiencing the mental formations, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Calming the mental formations, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Calming the mental formations, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Experiencing the mind, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Experiencing the mind, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Gladdening the mind, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Gladdening the mind, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Concentrating the mind, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Concentrating the mind, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Liberating the mind from hindrances, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Liberating the mind from hindrances, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Contemplating impermanence, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Contemplating impermanence, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Contemplating detachment, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Contemplating detachment, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Contemplating cessation, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Contemplating cessation, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself.

‘Contemplating relinquishment, I shall breathe in,’ thus he trains himself. ‘Contemplating relinquishment, I shall breathe out,’ thus he trains himself. This, Ānanda, is called the mindfulness of in and out breathing.

If, Ānanda, you visit the monk Girimānanda and tell him these ten perceptions, it is possible that having heard them, the monk Girimānanda will be immediately cured of his illness.

Then the Venerable Ānanda, having learned these ten perceptions in the presence of the Blessed One, went to the Venerable Girimānanda and told these ten perceptions to him.

When the Venerable Girimānanda heard these ten perceptions, his illness was immediately cured. The Venerable Girimānanda recovered from his illness, and thus went away the illness of the Venerable Girimānanda.

Sadhu! Sadhu! Sadhu!

(https://suttafriends.org/sutta/an10-60/)





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