Bilingual. 26. Memorandum of Conversation. Secretary of State, in the Chair. Mr. Helms described what seemed to him to be Nhu’s plan, that is, to hold pro-government rallies, set up pro-government Buddhist groups

24/10/20233:45 SA(Xem: 1292)
Bilingual. 26. Memorandum of Conversation. Secretary of State, in the Chair. Mr. Helms described what seemed to him to be Nhu’s plan, that is, to hold pro-government rallies, set up pro-government Buddhist groups

blank
Bilingual. 26. Memorandum of Conversation. Secretary of State, in the Chair. Mr. Helms described what seemed to him to be Nhu’s plan, that is, to hold pro-government rallies, set up pro-government Buddhist groups and, at a certain stage, pick off the opposition leaders; in general easing tensions and returning rapidly to the general posture of the GVN as of, say, August 20. The Secretary of State asked the question: “If the Generals do not intend to move and Diem-Nhu return to the August 20 posture, can we live with it?” Mr. Helms said that he did not know. Hilsman felt that, if Nhu assumed a prominent role, say, by occupying the new office of Prime Minister, and the action against the pagodas went without retribution, the graph of the future would be a slow but steady deterioration downwards in which apathy in the army, a drifting off of junior officers and noncommissioned officers, possibly student and labor strikes would slowly but surely degrade the war effort. // Biên bản buổi họp. Ngoại trưởng Dean Rusk, ở ghế chủ tọa. Ông Helms mô tả điều mà ông cho là kế hoạch của Nhu, – tức là tổ chức các cuộc mít tinh ủng hộ chính phủ, thành lập các nhóm Phật giáo thân chính và, ở một giai đoạn nhất định, loại bỏ các nhà lãnh đạo phe đối lập; nói chung là giảm bớt căng thẳng và nhanh chóng quay trở lại thế trận chung của Chính phủ VN kể từ ngày 20/8/1963. Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao đặt câu hỏi: “Nếu các Tướng khôngý định tiến hành đảo chánh và Diệm Nhu quay lại thế trận ngày 20/8 thì chúng tachấp nhận nổi không?” Ông Helms nói rằng ông không biết. Ông Hilsman cảm thấy rằng, nếu Nhu đảm nhận một vai trò nổi bật, chẳng hạn như bằng cách đảm nhận chức vụ Thủ tướng mới, và hành động đập phá các ngôi chùa mà không bị trừng phạt, thì đồ thị của tương lai sẽ là một sự suy thoái chậm nhưng đều đặn đi xuống, trong đó sự thờ ơ trong quân đội, sự rời bỏ của các sĩ quan cấp dưới và hạ sĩ quan, có thể là các cuộc bãi khóa của sinh viên và đình công của công nhân sẽ làm suy giảm nỗ lực chiến tranh một cách chậm rãi nhưng chắc chắn.

 

the Department of State 226. Memorandum of Conversation1

 

Washington, August 30, 1963—2:30 p.m.

SUBJECT:

Viet-Nam

PARTICIPANTS:
-- State Department:
. Secretary of State—in the Chair
. Mr. Hilsman
. Ambassador Nolting
-- White House:
. McGeorge Bundy
. Mr. Forrestal
-- CIA
. General Carter
. Mr. Helms
. Mr. Colby
-- Defense Department
. Secretary McNamara
. Mr. Gilpatric
. Gen. Maxwell Taylor
. Maj. Gen. Krulak
. Secretary of Treasury Dillon
. The Vice President
. USIA—Mr. Edward Murrow

The discussion began by focussing on the apparent “inertia” on the part of the Generals as mentioned in paragraph 5 of Lodge’s cable.2

The Secretary of Defense called attention to the cable reporting on the meeting with Lt. Col. Thao and expressed his feeling that the Thao plan was not worthy of serious consideration.3

Mr. Hilsman pointed out that the Generals had asked our opinion of Thao, expressing their distrust of him and that we had advised against their taking him into their confidence. This meeting might, therefore, have been their merely listening to him or an attempt by Thao to smoke out the opposition on behalf of Diem-Nhu.

Mr. Helms described what seemed to him to be Nhu’s plan, as described in a recent TDCS4—that is, to hold pro-government rallies, set up pro-government Buddhist groups and, at a certain stage, pick off the opposition leaders; in general easing tensions and returning rapidly to the general posture of the GVN as of, say, August 20.5

The Secretary of State asked the question: “If the Generals do not intend to move and Diem-Nhu return to the August 20 posture, can we live with it?” Mr. Helms said that he did not know. It depended upon whether Mr. Nhu would reverse his course. Mr. Helms said that Mr. Colby probably knew Nhu better than anyone else and asked his opinion.

Mr. Colby said that Nhu would not “reverse” his course; that he might well ease tensions and produce the facade of August 20, but he would most certainly proceed with his “personalist revolution” and his “strategic hamlet society.”

Ambassador Nolting said that Nhu was undoubtedly a shifty character but that he could assure everyone that Nhu would not really negotiate with Ho Chi Minh and would not move to a unification with North Vietnam; that he was committed to an anti-Communist course. He said that Nhu would undoubtedly pull shenanigans that would be difficult for the US, with Laos and with Cambodia and shenanigans that would, if anything, put the US into a harder confrontation with North Vietnam and with Communist China.

Mr. Hilsman said that the answer to the Secretary of State’s question, in his opinion, depended on the attitude of the Vietnamese people and the prominence of Nhu in the weeks and months ahead. He felt that, if Nhu assumed a prominent role, say, by occupying the new office of Prime Minister, and the action against the pagodas went without retribution, the graph of the future would be a slow but steady deterioration downwards in which apathy in the army, a drifting off of junior officers and noncommissioned officers, possibly student and labor strikes would slowly but surely degrade the war effort. If, on the other hand, Madame Nhu went on a long vacation and brother Nhu faded into the background, it was possible that the graph would be slightly upwards from level—i.e., that progress might be made in the war against the Viet Cong but it would be much slower and less certain and take several years longer than the Secretary of Defense and he had contemplated at, say, the last Honolulu meeting.6

The Secretary of State then turned to the question of the De Gaulle statement7 and French activity.

Mr. Colby said that it was possible that Nhu had been working through the French talking to the DRV. General Carter said that the Secretary had asked for any hunches on the situation there, and although we lacked information because Harkins had as yet been unable to make his contacts with the Generals, he was prepared to offer the following hunch: that is, that Nhu has known of our machinations for the last two or three days; that the Generals are backing off; that Nhu also is backing off in the sense that he is trying to do what the US wants and to put the GVN in as favorable a posture as possible. General Carter’s hunch was that the possibility of a Generals’ coup is out; that in one week’s time the GVN will look the same as it did as of the 20th of August; i.e. that Nhu will back off from repressive action in an attempt to give at least the appearance of a rapprochement with the US. General Carter said that there were several indications of this—the appointment of a new Ambassador;8 Madame Nhu’s silence; the pro-government rallies; the surfacing of pro-government Buddhists; the creation of a new inter-sect committee; allowing Mau to go on leave; the release of the students; the reopening of the schools; the easing of the curfew; the return of Radio Saigon back to civilian control.

The Secretary of Defense said that in his opinion the Generals didn’t have a plan and never did, contrary to their assurances.

After discussion it was made clear that the Generals did not say that they had a plan, but in their initial approach had said that they would develop one if they got US assurances. All agreed that from the evidence now available it looked as if the Generals were either backing off or were wallowing but that we could not know until after their meeting with Harkins. The Secretary of State said that the situation on Saturday9 appeared to be that the Vietnamese military wanted to mount a coup; that they wanted US assurances of support even [Page 56]though it would be a Vietnamese affair; that our response was that we would support them in an effort that was truly Vietnamese; that the main target was Nhu; and that the Generals could keep Diem if they desired. By this Saturday10 there does not appear to be much in it. The Secretary felt that we should send a cable to Lodge expressing these concerns, picking up the reference in Lodge’s remark that nothing seemed to be happening.

The Secretary of State said that one contingency we should look at urgently, since it seemed to be the most likely one, was what we would do if the Generals’ approach was only an exercise in frustration and gossip. Maybe the thing to do was to get the Generals back to fighting the war.

There was some discussion of counter-indicators, e.g., the possibility of riots, the reports of planned arrests of Generals and so on.

Mr. Nolting asked if the cable to Lodge ought not to withdraw some of the authority already delegated. He was especially thinking of the instruction that permitted Harkins to talk with the Generals.

Mr. Hilsman pointed out that Harkins was authorized to give assurances to the Generals and to review their planning but not to engage in planning with them.

The Secretary of Defense read the instructions to Harkins and all agreed that they were appropriate and should not be altered.11

Mr. Hilsman pointed out that at some stage, but certainly not until we had the results of Harkins’ meeting with the Generals, we would have to look at the question of whether we should cross over from assuring the Generals to a policy of forcing them into a position in which they had to take action, i.e., whether we could precipitate action by the Generals. The question here was whether the Generals had enough will and determination even to be forced. We could, however, know this only if we had more information.

The Secretary said we needed papers on a much wider range of contingencies. As he had said before, we needed a paper on the contingency if there is no coup attempt. What we needed is one list of the whole range of contingencies. One would be the frittering away of the interest of the Generals in a coup attempt. Another would be if their plan is inadequate in the US view for a successful coup.

The contingency paper dated August 3012 was distributed, and the Secretary of Defense said he thought the consolidated list of contingencies and US responses ought to eliminate any assumptions. In addition to those in the paper, which were based on the assumption that a coup would in fact be mounted, we ought to examine several [Page 57]more. One was that Diem and Nhu eased pressures either in arresting Generals or arresting a few key ones. Another was that Diem-Nhu eased pressures and Nhu takes power with the title of Prime Minister. Another was that Diem-Nhu eased pressures and Nhu becomes less prominent.

The Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, Mr. Gilpatric and others also suggested adding the following contingencies:

1. Political intervention by a third party, e.g., bringing the matter before the UN.

2. Pressure in the US to reduce aid unless Diem does things he is not now doing.

3. In the event of a successful coup—the slate of possible Ministers and the various forms that a government might take.

4. Request for a variety of US military help—from the use of helicopters ranging up to US troops.

5. Large scale civil disorders—from riots through civil war and including the sudden seizure of US communications centers and installations, including a set of these cables.

6. Increased Viet Cong activity in a variety of circumstances, including when the ARVN was split and possibly fighting among themselves.

7. DRV intervention into a chaotic situation-on its own initiative or by invitation.

8. Political activity outside Viet-Nam—e.g. Thailand, Ceylon and others having a regional meeting of Buddhist countries.

9. Difficulties between SVN and its neighbors—e.g. cutting off Mekong traffic to Cambodia as a result of withdrawal of recognition.

The papers requested above will be prepared as soon as possible and distributed piecemeal.

A meeting will be held at 11:00 tomorrow morning.

NOTES:

(1) Source: Kennedy Library, Hilsman Papers, Countries Series-Vietnam, White House Meetings, State memcons. Top Secret; Eyes Only; No Distribution. Drafted by Hilsman. The meeting was held at the Department of State. There are two other records of this meeting: a memorandum of discussion by Bromley Smith, August 29 (ibid., National Security Files, Meetings and Memoranda, Meetings on Vietnam) and a memorandum for the record by Krulak, August 30 (National Defense University, Taylor Papers, T-172-69).

(2) Reference is to Document 20. In Smith’s record of the meeting, the deliberations began as follows:

“Secretary Rusk opened the meeting by requesting an analysis of reports received from the field estimating forces loyal to Diem and forces loyal to the generals’ coup.

“General Taylor, in summary, said the Presidential Guard and Special Forces were on Diem’s side. Other generals may or may not be loyal to Diem.

“Secretary Rusk reminded the group of its obligation to the President. It was not clear to him who we are dealing with and we were apparently operating in a jungle.”

(3) Reference is to Document 22. In both Smith’s and Krulak’s records of the meeting, McNamara specifically states that General Harkins must get in touch with the Vietnamese generals to learn more. Smith also recounts McNamara stating that the United States should not give the generals support until Harkins makes contact with them.

(4) Not further identified.

(5) Both Smith and Krulak stated that Helms believed that the CIA had no evidence that would suggest that the generals had a plan. According to Smith, Helms also stated that “it appears that Colonel Tho [Thao] is being looked to to do the coup planning.” Krulak recounts that Helms found “the Thao report most disquieting to him.”

(6) Regarding the Secretary of Defense’s conference in Honolulu, May 6, see vol. III, pp. 264–270.

(7) On August 29, French President Charles De Gaulle made a statement on Vietnam at a meeting of the French Council of Ministers. At the close of the Council meeting, the French Minister of Information, Alain Peyrefitte, read the statement to news correspondents. The statement reads in part as follows: “France’s knowledge of the merits of this people makes her appreciate the role they would be capable of playing in the current situation in Asia for their own progress and to further international understanding, once they could go ahead with their activities independently of the outside, in internal peace and unity and in harmony with their neighbors. Today more than ever, this is what France wishes for Vietnam as a whole. Naturally it is up to this people, and to them alone, to choose the means of achieving it, but any national effort that would be carried out in Vietnam would find France ready, to the extent of her own possibilities, to establish cordial cooperation with this country.” The full text is printed in American Foreign Policy: Current Documents, 1963, p. 869.

(8) The new Vietnamese Ambassador to the United States, Do Vang Ly.

(9) August 24.

(10) August 31.

(11) Not found.

(12) Document 25.

Source:

https://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1961-63v04/d26

.... o ....

 

26. Biên bản buổi họp (1)

 

Washington, ngày 30 tháng 8 năm 1963—lúc 2 giờ 30 chiều.

CHỦ ĐỀ:

Việt Nam

CÓ MẶT TRONG BUỔI HỌP:

-- Bộ Ngoại giao:
. Ngoại trưởng Dean Rusk—ở ghế chủ tọa
. Ông Roger Hilsman (Phụ tá Ngoại trưởng về Viễn Đông)
. Đại sứ Nolting
-- Bạch Ốc:
. McGeorge Bundy (Phụ tá Đặc biệt của Tổng Thống về An ninh Quốc gia)
. Ông Michael Forrestal (Hội Đồng An Ninh Quốc Gia)
-- CIA
. Tướng Marshall Carter (Phó Giám Đốc CIA)
. Ông Richard Helms (Phó Giám Đốc Kế Hoạch, CIA
. Ông William Colby (Giám đốc Phỏng Viễn Đông, CIA)
-- Bộ quốc phòng
. Bộ Trưởng QP Robert McNamara
. Ông Roswell Gilpatric (Thứ trưởng QP)
. Tướng Maxwell Taylor (Tham mưu trưởng Liên quân)
. Thiếu tướng Victor Krulak (TQLC, Phụ tá Đặc biệt Chống Nổi Dậy)
. Bộ trưởng Tài chính Dillon
. Phó Tổng Thống
. USIA— Edward Murrow (Giám đốc Phỏng Thông Tin)

Cuộc thảo luận bắt đầu bằng việc tập trung vào “sức ì” rõ ràng về phía các Tướng như đã đề cập ở đoạn 5 trong điện tín của Lodge.(2)

Bộ trưởng Bộ Quốc phòng kêu gọi sự chú ý đến bức điện tường thuật về cuộc gặp với Trung tá Thảo và bày tỏ cảm giác rằng kế hoạch của Thảo không đáng được xem xét nghiêm túc.(3)

Ông Hilsman chỉ ra rằng các Tướng đã hỏi ý kiến của chúng ta về Thảo, bày tỏ sự không tin tưởng vào ông Thảo và rằng chúng ta đã khuyên họ không nên tin tưởng ông Thảo. Do đó, cuộc gặp đó có thể chỉ là việc họ lắng nghe Thảo hoặc một nỗ lực của Thảo nhằm tiêu diệt phe đối lập thay mặt cho Diệm-Nhu.

Ông Helms mô tả điều mà ông cho là kế hoạch của Nhu, như được mô tả trong TDCS(4) gần đâytức là tổ chức các cuộc mít tinh ủng hộ chính phủ, thành lập các nhóm Phật giáo thân chính và, ở một giai đoạn nhất định, loại bỏ các nhà lãnh đạo phe đối lập; nói chung là giảm bớt căng thẳng và nhanh chóng quay trở lại thế trận chung của Chính phủ Việt Nam kể từ ngày 20/8/1963 (5).

(Lời Người Dịch: Nơi dòng vừa dẫn là nói về đêm 20/8/1963, một dấu mốc đàn áp Phật giáo, khi ông Nhu ra lệnh đột kích các chùa toàn quốc, mang vũ khí vào chùa vu khống, bắt giam hơn 1.400 nhà sư, làm nhiều vị sư bị thương nặng, một số vị sư chết và mất tích.)

Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao đặt câu hỏi: “Nếu các Tướng khôngý định tiến hành đảo chánh và Diệm Nhu quay lại thế trận ngày 20/8 thì chúng tachấp nhận nổi không?” Ông Helms nói rằng ông không biết. Điều đó phụ thuộc vào việc ông Nhu có đảo ngược đường lối của mình hay không. Ông Helms cho rằng ông Colby có lẽ hiểu rõ Nhu hơn ai hết và hỏi ý kiến ông.

Ông Colby nói rằng Nhu sẽ không “đảo ngược” đường lối của Nhu; rằng ông Nhu có thể xoa dịu căng thẳng và tạo ra bề ngoài của ngày 20 tháng 8, nhưng chắc chắn ông Nhu sẽ tiến hành “cuộc cách mạng nhân vị chủ nghĩa” và “xã hội ấp chiến lược” của mình.

Đại sứ Nolting nói rằng Nhu chắc chắn là một nhân vật gian xảo nhưng Nolting có thể đảm bảo với mọi người rằng Nhu sẽ không thực sự đàm phán với Hồ Chí Minh và sẽ không tiến tới thống nhất với Bắc Việt; rằng Nhu đã cam kết theo đuổi con đường chống Cộng. Ông Nolting nói rằng Nhu chắc chắn sẽ gây ra những trò tai quái gây khó khăn cho Mỹ, với Lào và với Campuchia và những trò tai quái mà nếu có, sẽ đẩy Mỹ vào một cuộc đối đầu khó khăn hơn với Bắc Việt và với Trung Quốc Cộng sản.

Ông Hilsman cho rằng, theo ông, câu trả lời cho câu hỏi của Ngoại trưởng phụ thuộc vào thái độ của người dân Việt Nam và sự nổi bật của ông Nhu trong những tuần, và những tháng tới. Ông cảm thấy rằng, nếu Nhu đảm nhận một vai trò nổi bật, chẳng hạn như bằng cách đảm nhận chức vụ Thủ tướng mới, và hành động đập phá các ngôi chùa mà không bị trừng phạt, thì đồ thị của tương lai sẽ là một sự suy thoái chậm nhưng đều đặn đi xuống, trong đó sự thờ ơ trong quân đội, sự rời bỏ của các sĩ quan cấp dưới và hạ sĩ quan, có thể là các cuộc bãi khóa của sinh viên và đình công của công nhân sẽ làm suy giảm nỗ lực chiến tranh một cách chậm rãi nhưng chắc chắn. Mặt khác, nếu bà Nhu đi nghỉ dài ngày và ông Nhu mờ dần ở phía sau, có thể biểu đồ sẽ hơi hướng lên trên so với cấp độ - tức là, tiến bộ đó có thể được thực hiện trong cuộc chiến chống Việt Cộng nhưng nó sẽ chậm hơn, kém chắc chắn hơn nhiều và mất nhiều thời gian hơn là mốc thời gian mà Bộ trưởng Quốc phòng và ông đã dự phóng tại cuộc họp gần đây nhất ở Honolulu.(6)

Sau đó, Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao chuyển sang câu hỏi về tuyên bố của De Gaulle(7) và hoạt động của Pháp.

Ông Colby cho rằng có thể Nhu đã làm việc thông qua người Pháp để nói chuyện với Bắc Việt. Tướng Carter nói rằng Bộ trưởng đã yêu cầu có bất kỳ linh cảm nào về tình hình ở đó, và mặc dù chúng tôi thiếu thông tin vì Harkins vẫn chưa thể liên lạc được với các Tướng, nhưng ông ấy sẵn sàng đưa ra linh cảm sau: đó là, Nhu đã biết về âm mưu của chúng ta trong hai hoặc ba ngày qua; rằng các Tướng đang lùi bước; rằng Nhu cũng đang lùi bước theo nghĩa là ông Nhu đang cố gắng làm những gì Mỹ muốn và tạo cho Chính phủ Việt Nam một thế trận thuận lợi nhất có thể. Linh cảm của Tướng Carter là khả năng xảy ra một cuộc đảo chính của các Tướng đã không còn nữa; rằng trong một tuần nữa Chính phủ Việt Nam sẽ giống như ngày 20 tháng 8; tức là Nhu sẽ rút lui khỏi hành động đàn áp nhằm cố gắng ít nhất tạo ra vẻ ngoài có vẻ như đang xích lại gần nhau với Mỹ. Tướng Carter nói rằng có một số dấu hiệu cho thấy điều này – việc bổ nhiệm một Đại sứ mới;(8) sự im lặng của Bà Nhu; các cuộc biểu tình ủng hộ chính phủ; sự xuất hiện của giáo hội Phật giáo thân chính; thành lập ủy ban liên ngành mới; cho Vũ Văn Mẫu được nghỉ phép; thả sinh viên, học sinh; việc mở lại trường học; việc nới lỏng lệnh giới nghiêm; việc Đài phát thanh Sài Gòn trở lại quyền kiểm soát dân sự.

Bộ trưởng Quốc phòng cho rằng, theo ông, các Tướng khôngkế hoạchchưa bao giờ thực hiện, trái với cam kết của họ.

Sau khi thảo luận, rõ ràng là các Tướng không nói rằng họ có kế hoạch, nhưng trong cách tiếp cận ban đầu của họ đã nói rằng họ sẽ phát triển một kế hoạch nếu nhận được sự bảo đảm của Hoa Kỳ. Tất cả đều đồng ý rằng từ những bằng chứng hiện có, có vẻ như các vị Tướng đang lùi bước hoặc đang chìm đắm nhưng chúng ta không thể biết được cho đến sau cuộc gặp của họ với Harkins. Ngoại trưởng cho rằng tình hình hôm thứ Bảy(9) có vẻ như quân đội Việt Nam muốn đảo chính; rằng họ muốn Hoa Kỳ bảo đảm hỗ trợ ngay cả dù đó là chuyện của Việt Nam; rằng phản ứng của chúng tachúng ta sẽ hỗ trợ họ trong một nỗ lực thực sự mang đậm chất Việt Nam; mục tiêu chính là Nhu; và rằng các Tướng có thể giữ Diệm [làm Tổng Thống] nếu họ muốn. Đến Thứ Bảy (10) này dường như không còn nhiều thứ nữa. Bộ trưởng cảm thấy rằng chúng ta nên gửi một bức điện tới Lodge để bày tỏ những quan ngại này, đồng thời nhắc đến nhận xét của Lodge rằng dường như không có chuyện gì xảy ra.

Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao nói rằng một tình huống bất ngờ mà chúng ta nên xem xét khẩn cấp, vì nó có vẻ là khả thi nhất, đó là điều chúng ta sẽ làm nếu cách tiếp cận của các Tướng chỉ là một hành động gây thất vọng và chỉ là nói chuyện phiếm. Có lẽ việc cần làm là kêu gọi các Tướng trở lại chiến đấu.

Đã có một số cuộc thảo luận về các chỉ số phản bác, ví dụ: khả năng xảy ra bạo loạn, các tin mật báo về kế hoạch bắt giam các Tướng, v.v.

Ông Nolting hỏi liệu điện tín gửi tới Lodge có nên rút lại một số thẩm quyền đã được giao hay không. Ông đặc biệt nghĩ đến chỉ thị cho phép Harkins nói chuyện với các Tướng.

Ông Hilsman chỉ ra rằng Harkins được ủy quyền đưa ra những đảm bảo cho các Tướng và xem xét kế hoạch của họ nhưng không được tham gia vào việc lập kế hoạch với họ.

Bộ trưởng Quốc phòng đọc hướng dẫn cho Harkins và tất cả đều đồng ý rằng chúng phù hợp và không nên thay đổi.(11)

Ông Hilsman chỉ ra rằng ở một giai đoạn nào đó, nhưng chắc chắn là phải đến khi có kết quả cuộc gặp của Harkins với các Tướng, chúng ta mới phải xem xét vấn đề liệu chúng ta có nên chuyển từ việc đảm bảo với các Tướng sang chính sách ép buộc các Tướng rơi vào tình thế mà họ phải hành động, tức là liệu chúng ta có thể thúc đẩy hành động của các Tướng hay không. Vấn đề ở đây là liệu các Tướng có đủ ý chí, quyết tâm để bị ép buộc đảo chánh hay không. Tuy nhiên, chúng ta chỉ có thể biết điều này nếu có thêm thông tin.

Bộ trưởng nói rằng chúng ta cần soạn các dự thảo ghi sẵn trên giấy về nhiều tình huống bất ngờ hơn. Như ông đã nói trước đây, chúng ta cần một dự thảo trên giấy về tình huống dự phòng nếu khôngâm mưu đảo chính. Những gì chúng ta cần là một danh sách toàn bộ các tình huống dự phòng. Một là việc mất đi lợi ích của các Tướng trong một âm mưu đảo chính. Một vấn đề khác là nếu kế hoạch của họ không phù hợp theo quan điểm của Hoa Kỳ về một cuộc đảo chính thành công.

Một dự thảo kế hoạch ghi sẵn trên giấy đề ngày 30/8/1963 (12) đã được phân phát và Bộ trưởng Quốc phòng cho biết ông nghĩ rằng danh sách tổng hợp các tình huống dự phòngphản ứng của Hoa Kỳ phải loại bỏ mọi giả định. Ngoài những điều trong tờ kế hoạch dự phòng dựa trên giả định rằng một cuộc đảo chính trên thực tế sẽ diễn ra, chúng ta nên xem xét thêm một số tình huống nữa. Một là Diệm và Nhu đã giảm bớt áp lực trong ý định bắt giữ các Tướng hoặc chỉ bắt giữ Tướng chủ chốt. Một tình huống nữa là Diệm-Nhu đã giảm bớt áp lực và Nhu lên nắm quyền với chức danh Thủ tướng. Một tình huống khác nữa là Diệm-Nhu đã giảm bớt áp lực và Nhu trở nên kém quyền lực hơn.

Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao, Bộ trưởng Quốc phòng, ông Gilpatric và những người khác cũng đề nghị bổ sung các trường hợp dự phòng sau:

1. Sự can thiệp chính trị của bên thứ ba, ví dụ: đưa vấn đề ra trước Liên hợp quốc.

2. Áp lực ở Mỹ cắt giảm viện trợ trừ khi Diệm làm những việc mà hiện nay ông không làm.

3. Trong trường hợp đảo chính thành công—danh sách các Bộ trưởng có thể có và các hình thức khác nhau mà chính phủ có thể áp dụng.

4. Yêu cầu nhiều loại trợ giúp quân sự của Hoa Kỳ—từ việc sử dụng máy bay trực thăng cho đến quân đội Hoa Kỳ.

5. Rối loạn dân sự quy mô lớn—từ bạo loạn đến nội chiến và bao gồm cả việc đột ngột chiếm giữ các trung tâm và cơ sở liên lạc của Hoa Kỳ, bao gồm cả một cơ sở gửi điện tín mật.

6. Gia tăng hoạt động của Việt Cộng trong nhiều hoàn cảnh khác nhau, kể cả khi QLVNCH bị chia cắt và có thể xảy ra xung đột lẫn nhau.

7. Bắc Việt can thiệp vào tình thế hỗn loạn - do tự mình hoặc theo lời mời.

8. Hoạt động chính trị bên ngoài Việt Nam—ví dụ: Thái Lan, Tích Lan và các nước khác tổ chức cuộc họp khu vực của các quốc gia Phật giáo.

9. Khó khăn giữa Nam Việt Nam và các nước láng giềng—ví dụ: cắt đứt lưu thông sông Mê Kông đến Campuchia do rút lại sự công nhận ngoại giao.

Các tình huống ghi sẵn trên giấy được yêu cầu ở trên sẽ được chuẩn bị càng sớm càng tốt và phân phát từng phần.

Cuộc họp sẽ được tổ chức vào lúc 11 giờ sáng mai.

GHI CHÚ:

(1) Nguồn: Thư viện Kennedy, Hilsman Papers, Country Series-Việt Nam, White House Meets, State memcons. Bí mật hàng đầu; Chỉ để đọc; Không phân phối. Được soạn thảo bởi Roger Hilsman. Cuộc họp được tổ chức tại Bộ Ngoại giao. Có hai tài liệu khác về cuộc họp này: một bản ghi nhớ thảo luận của Bromley Smith, ngày 29 tháng 8 (sđd., Hồ sơ An ninh Quốc gia, Cuộc họp và Bản ghi nhớ, Cuộc họp về Việt Nam) và bản ghi nhớ của Krulak, ngày 30 tháng 8 (Đại học Quốc phòng), Taylor Papers, T-172-69).

(2) Tham chiếu đến Tài liệu 20. Trong biên bản cuộc họp của Bromley Smith, các cuộc thảo luận bắt đầu như sau:

“Ngoại trưởng Rusk mở đầu cuộc họp bằng cách yêu cầu phân tích các báo cáo nhận được từ hiện trường, ước tính các đơn vị trung thành với Diệm và các đơn vị dự kiến đảo chính của các tướng.

“Tóm lại, Tướng Taylor nói rằng Lực lượng Vệ binh Tổng thống và Lực lượng Đặc biệt đứng về phía Diệm. Các tướng khác có thể trung thành hoặc không trung thành với Diệm.

“Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao Dean Rusk đã nhắc cả nhóm về trách nhiệm đối với Tổng thống Kennedy. Rusk nói là chưa thấy rõ chúng ta [Hoa Kỳ] đang đối phó với ai và dường như chúng ta đang hoạt động trong rừng.”

(3) Tham khảo Tài liệu 22. Trong biên bản cuộc họp của cả Smith và Krulak, McNamara nêu cụ thể rằng Tướng Harkins phải liên lạc với các tướng Việt Nam để tìm hiểu thêm. Smith cũng kể lại McNamara nói rằng Hoa Kỳ không nên hỗ trợ các tướng cho đến khi Harkins liên lạc với họ.

(4) Không được xác định thêm.

(5) Cả Smith và Krulak đều tuyên bố rằng Helms tin rằng CIA không có bằng chứng nào cho thấy các tướng đã có kế hoạch. Theo Smith, Helms cũng tuyên bố rằng “có vẻ như Đại tá Tho [Thảo] đang lập kế hoạch đảo chính”. Krulak kể lại rằng Helms nhận thấy “bản báo cáo của Thảo khiến ông lo lắng nhất”.

(6) Về hội nghị Bộ trưởng Quốc phòng ở Honolulu, ngày 6 tháng 5, xem tập. III, trang 264–270.

(7) Ngày 29/8, Tổng thống Pháp Charles De Gaulle đã đưa ra tuyên bố về Việt Nam tại cuộc họp Hội đồng Bộ trưởng Pháp. Khi kết thúc cuộc họp Hội đồng, Bộ trưởng Thông tin Pháp, Alain Peyrefitte, đọc tuyên bố trước các phóng viên. Tuyên bố có đoạn như sau: “Hiểu biết của Pháp về giá trị của người dân này khiến nước này đánh giá cao vai trò mà họ có thể đảm nhận trong tình hình hiện tại ở châu Á vì sự tiến bộ của chính họ và để nâng cao sự hiểu biết quốc tế, một khi họ có thể tiếp tục thực hiện hoạt động độc lập với bên ngoài, trong nội bộ hòa bình, đoàn kết và hòa hợp với các nước láng giềng. Ngày nay hơn bao giờ hết, đây là điều mà nước Pháp mong muốn đối với Việt Nam nói chung. Đương nhiên, việc lựa chọn phương tiện để đạt được điều đó là tùy thuộc vào người dân này và chỉ họ, nhưng bất kỳ nỗ lực quốc gia nào được thực hiệnViệt Nam sẽ khiến Pháp sẵn sàng, trong khả năng của mình, thiết lập quan hệ hợp tác thân thiện với Việt Nam." Toàn văn được in trong sách American Foreign Policy: Current Documents, 1963, p. 869 (Chính sách đối ngoại của Mỹ: Các tài liệu hiện tại, 1963, tr. 869).

(8) Tân Đại sứ Việt Nam tại Hoa Kỳ Đỗ Vạn Lý.

(9) Ngày 24 tháng 8.

(10) Ngày 31 tháng 8.

(11) Không tìm thấy.

(12) Văn bản 25.

.

Kho sử liệu PHẬT GIÁO VIỆT NAM 1963 - SONG NGỮ:

https://thuvienhoasen.org/a39405/phat-giao-viet-nam-1963-song-ngu

 

.... o ....

 

 

 

 

Gủi hàng từ MỸ về VIỆT NAM
Gủi hàng từ MỸ về VIỆT NAM
Tạo bài viết
Thời Phật giáo xuống đường vào những năm 1960, anh Cao Huy Thuần là một nhà làm báo mà tôi chỉ là một đoàn sinh GĐPT đi phát báo. Thuở ấy, tờ LẬP TRƯỜNG như một tiếng kèn xông xáo trong mặt trận văn chương và xã hội của khuynh hướng Phật giáo dấn thân, tôi mê nhất là mục Chén Thuốc Đắng của Ba Cao do chính anh Thuần phụ trách. Đó là mục chính luận sắc bén nhất của tờ báo dưới hình thức phiếm luận hoạt kê. Rồi thời gian qua đi, anh Thuần sang Pháp và ở luôn bên đó. Đạo pháp và thế sự thăng trầm..
Nguồn tin của Báo Giác Ngộ từ quý Thầy tại Phật đường Khuông Việt và gia đình cho biết Giáo sư Cao Huy Thuần, một trí thức, Phật tử thuần thành, vừa trút hơi thở cuối cùng xả bỏ huyễn thân vào lúc 23 giờ 26 phút ngày 7-7-2024 (nhằm mùng 2-6-Giáp Thìn), tại Pháp.
"Chỉ có hai ngày trong năm là không thể làm được gì. Một ngày gọi là ngày hôm qua và một ngày kia gọi là ngày mai. Ngày hôm nay mới chính là ngày để tin, yêu và sống trọn vẹn. (Đức Đạt Lai Lạt Ma 14)