Bilingual. 289. President Kennedy asked if we are adequately prepared for protecting and/or evacuating U.S. citizens in Vietnam. Admiral Felt said that unless the Nhus were eliminated the middle-level enlisted men would soon lose their interest in fighting.

21/09/20233:58 SA(Xem: 1597)
Bilingual. 289. President Kennedy asked if we are adequately prepared for protecting and/or evacuating U.S. citizens in Vietnam. Admiral Felt said that unless the Nhus were eliminated the middle-level enlisted men would soon lose their interest in fighting.
blank

 

Bilingual. 289. President Kennedy asked if we are adequately prepared for protecting and/or evacuating U.S. citizens in Vietnam. Admiral Felt said that unless the Nhus were eliminated the middle-level enlisted men would soon lose their interest in fighting. President Kennedy commented that he did not believe that Diem would let his brother be ejected from the scene. Kennedy asked if the Foreign Minister who recently resigned might be a good candidate for Vietnamese presidency. Hilsman said that mostly the Vietnamese people seem to want to get rid of the Nhus. Hilsman: the act of beating up the Pagodas swung people against the regime.// Tổng thống Kennedy hỏi liệu đã có chuẩn bị đầy đủ để bảo vệ và/hoặc di tản công dân Hoa Kỳ tại VN hay không. Đô đốc Felt nói, nếu ông bà Nhu không bị tước quyền lực, các sĩ quan trung cấp của VN sẽ không còn tinh thần chiến đấu. Tổng thống Kennedy nhận xét rằng ông không tin ông Diệm sẽ để ông Nhu bị đuổi ra khỏi hiện trường quyền lực. Kennedy hỏi liệu Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao VN Vũ Văn Mẫu vừa mới từ chức có thể là một ứng cử viên sáng giá giữ chức Tổng Thống VN hay không. Hilsman nói hầu hết dân VN lộ ý như dường muốn loại bỏ ông bà Nhu. Hilsman: hành động đập phá các Chùa đã khiến người dân VN chống lại chế độ.

 

Office-of-the-Historian-logo_500x168 (1)289. Memorandum for the Record1

 

Washington, August 26, 1963, noon .

SUBJECT

Vietnam

1. Present, in addition to the President, were:

Secretary RuskSecretary McNamara
General Taylor
Mr. Ball
Govemor Harriman
Mr. Gilpatric
General Carter
Mr. Helms
Mr. Bundy
Mr. Forrestal
Major General Krulak

2. Mr. Hilsman summarized the current situation concerning the execution of the plan outlined in State Cable 243,2 to include the visits contemplated with Generals Khiem and Khanh.

3. The President asked if we are adequately prepared for protecting and/or evacuating U.S. citizens in Vietnam. He was shown the’ summary of military preparations to back up the Embassy program and was told that we have a battalion landing team at sea, 24 hours distant from Saigon now.

4. The President observed that Mr. Halberstam of the New York Times is actually running a political campaign; that he is wholly unobjective, reminiscent of Mr. Matthews in the Castro days. He stated that it was essential that we not permit Halberstam unduly to influence our actions.3 Mr. Hilsman assured the President that this was not the case.

5. Governor Harriman interjected the opinion that in this case we have acted at the first opportunity; that at an earlier moment we could not have accurately located the sources of strength and support.4

6. The President observed5 that Diem and his brother, however repugnant in some respects, have done a great deal along the lines that we desire and, when we move to eliminate this government, it should not be a result of New York Times pressure.

7. General Taylor observed that there are many military difficulties involved in the execution of the plan embodied in the 243 cable; that the Vietnamese military is split three ways; that Diem is truly the focus and that we should put our first effort on him.

8. Secretary Ball raised the question of whether Diem knows the extent to which his brother is undermining him, offering as an example the thousands of his personal pictures which have been printed and displayed.

9. The President recalled that about six weeks ago Nhu had a meeting with the Generals6 and raised the question of whether he is trying to take over himself. Hilsman responded that Nhu is riding the fence. He continued on the Nhu subject by stating that Admiral Felt had called him, referred to various cables involved in the situation, and expressed concern as to what would happen unless the Nhus were removed. Hilsman quoted him as saying that unless the Nhus were eliminated the middle level enlisted men would soon lose their interest in fighting. Felt believed that the Generals could handle the situation but that we will have to make known our willingness to support them. Hilsman said that subsequent to this call Felt called him again and counselled against delay. He reiterated, following a query from General Taylor, that Admiral Felt had called him.7

10. The President asked General Taylor, in light of his experience in the Pentagon, what chance a plan such as outlined in State Cable 243 would have of succeeding. General Taylor replied that in Washington we would not turn over the problem of choosing a head of state to the military.

11. Mr. Hilsman then raised the question of whether it would be wise to have a public or a classified statement concerning the curtailment of travel. The President approved a classified approach to the problem, following Hilsman’s advice that a public statement might in some way tip our hand.

12. The President asked what the Voice of America is saying on the subject, to which Mr. Hilsman replied that they were guilty of an error today when they speculated on our use of aid cuts as a sanction against the Vietnamese. He stated that this was contrary to explicit instructions that Voice of America should not become involved in speculation.

13. Mr. Rusk asked when Ambassador Lodge plans to have a business session with Diem. Hilsman had no knowledge of any planned meeting.

14. Mr. McNamara stated that a study of the problem raised these questions in his mind:

a. Exactly what Generals are we speaking of when we address the, subject of a “general officers group”?

To this Hilsman replied that while we have contacted only three (Khiem, Khanh and Minh) there are others, although these three declined to name their colleagues. Mr. McNamara then expressed the view that we should query Saigon as to exactly who the loyal Generals are.

b. His second question was: what exactly do we mean in State Cable 243 by the term “direct support”?

Hilsman replied that this meant finding ways to support the Vietnamese military logistically, not using Saigon as a port of entry.

Mr. Rusk asked me if I was familiar with the geography of the area, to which I replied in the affirmative. He then asked if I believed it would be practical to provide logistical support to the military forces directly, without the use of Saigon as a logistic base. I stated that it would be extremely difficult, involving major changes in our system and equipment and would require considerable time to develop a completely new arrangement. General Taylor stated that, in any case, this idea had not been examined by the military and that he would estimate it to be a very difficult project.

Mr. McNamara concluded the discussion on this question by stating that he believed we should query our representation in Saigon and find out more on their interpretation of what the “direct support” requirement embodies.

c. Mr. McNamara’s third question was what Ambassador Lodge is to say to Diem. There never really was a response to this question.

The President commented that he did not believe that Diem would let his brother be ejected from the scene. Secretary Rusk demurred from this viewpoint stating that he was not at all sure this was the case, while Mr. Hilsman said that the Country Team believes that Diem and Nhu will rise or fall together.

15. Mr. McNamara then raised the question of who Ambassador Lodge believes could replace Diem, stating that if we stand by and let a weak man get in the Presidency we will ultimately suffer. In this regard the President asked if the Foreign Minister who recently resigned8 might be a good candidate, to which Hilsman replied in the negative—stating that it is his view that the Generals would probably support Big Minh.

16. Secretary Rusk suggested that it might be possible to survive with Vice.President Tho at the head, supported by a strong military junta.

17. The President asked what would happen if we find we are faced with having to live with Diem and Nhu, to which Hilsman replied this would be horrible to contemplate because of Nhu’s grave emotional instability.

18. Mr. Rusk then stated that, in the broad sense, it appears that unless a major change in GVN policy can be engineered, we must actually decide whether to move our resources out or to move our troops in.

19. The President asked if we are being blamed in Vietnam for the situation, to which Hilsman responded that we may be suffering slightly but that mostly the people seem to want to get rid of the Nhus, but clearly need U.S. support to do so. He stated that, on these terms, it is imperative that we act.

20. The President stated that there should be another meeting tomorrow to discuss the matter further. Mr. McNamara stated that, as a matter of first priority, we should procure biographical sketches of the key personalities involved, following which General Taylor suggested that we should talk to Ambassador Nolting. The President agreed and stated that Nolting should be brought to the meeting tomorrow, following which Mr. Hilsman commented that Nolting’s view are colored, in that he is emotionally involved in the situation. Upon hearing this, the President observed, “Maybe properly.”

21. The President then stated that the matters discussed in the room should be held very closely and that the need-to-know group should be kept in the minimum number.

V.H. Krulak

Major General, USMC

NOTES:

(1) Source: National Defense University, Taylor Papers, Vietnam, chap. XXIII. Top Secret; Sensitive. Drafted by Krulak. The meeting was held at the White House. A memorandum of conversation of this meeting by Hilsman is in the Kennedy Library, Hilsman Papers, Countries, Vietnam, White House Meetings, State Memcons.

(2) Document 281.

(3) In Hilsman’s record of the meeting he paraphrased the President as follows: “Halberstam was a 28-year old kid and he [the President] wanted assurances we were not giving him serious consideration in our decision.”

(4) In Hilsman’s record of the meeting he reported Harriman’s observations as follows: “Governor Harriman pointed out that the decision was taken at the earliest possible moment that it could have been; that Saturday [August 24] was the first day that we knew the situation and that no such decision could ever have been taken unless the people of Viet-Nam had themselves fumed against the government; i.e., the act of beating up the Pagodas swung people against the regime and that we had made our decision at the earliest possible moment after that act.”

(5) Hilsman’s record of the President’s observations at this point reads: “The President asked a number of questions about the personalities and the relationships between Khiem, Khanh, Minh, Nhu, General Don and so forth. The relative strength of the various forces in Saigon was also discussed-the impression being left that Colonel Tung’s forces were the only military now present in Saigon with the exception of some Marine battalions which might in fact be loyal to Nhu.”

(6) See Document 220.

(7) In Hilsman’s record, he observed: “Maxwell Taylor was visibly upset that Felt had called Hilsman and I am sure Felt will hear about it.” In JCS telegram 2219, August 26, Taylor queried Felt if Hilsman’s account of these telephone conversations was accurate. (National Defense University, Taylor Papers, Vietnam, chap. XXIII) In CINCPAC telegram 262317, August 27, Felt responded that he made two calls to Hilsman on August 24. In the first he recommended U.S. support for a move by the Generals against Nhu; in the second Felt stated he did not counsel against delay, but merely asked to be included as an information recipient of appropriate telegrams on this question. (Ibid., T-172-69) In JCS telegram 2253, August 27, Taylor on behalf of the Joint Chiefs reprimanded Felt for expressing his views on a substantive issue outside of proper channels. (Ibid.)

(8) Vu Van Mau.

Source:

https://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1961-63v03/d289

 

.... o ....

 

289. Biên bản ghi nhớ để lưu hồ sơ (1)

 

Washington, trưa ngày 26 tháng 8 năm 1963.

CHỦ ĐỀ:

Việt Nam

1. Có mặt, bên cạnh Tổng Thống Kennedy, còn có:

Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao Dean Rusk
Bộ trưởng Quốc phòng Robert McNamara
Tướng Tham mưu trưởng Liên quân Maxwell Taylor
Thứ trưởng Ngoại giao Georga Ball
Thứ trưởng Ngoại giao về chính trị Averell Harriman (cựu Thống đốc New York)
Thứ trưởng Quốc phòng Roswell Gilpatric
Tướng Marshall Carter (Phó Giám đốc CIA)
Richard Helms (Phó Giám đốc CIA về kế hoạch)
McGeorge Bundy (Cố vấn An ninh Quốc gia)
Michael Forrestal (Thành viên Hội đồng An ninh Quốc gia)
Thiếu tướng Victor Krulak (Phụ tá Đặc biệt về Chống nổi dậy)

2. Ông Hilsman tóm tắt tình hình hiện tại liên quan đến việc thực hiện kế hoạch được nêu trong Công điện 243 do Bộ ngoại giao [gửi] (2) bao gồm các chuyến thăm suy tính với các Tướng Trần Thiện Khiêm và Tướng Nguyễn Khánh.

3. Tổng thống Kennedy hỏi liệu chúng ta có chuẩn bị đầy đủ cho việc bảo vệ và/hoặc di tản công dân Hoa Kỳ tại Việt Nam hay không. Ông Kennedy được cho xem bản tóm tắt công tác chuẩn bị quân sự để hỗ trợ chương trình của Đại sứ quán và được biết chúng tôi có một tiểu đoàn đổ bộ trên biển, chỉ cách Sài Gòn 24 giờ đồng hồ.

4. Tổng thống Kennedy nhận thấy rằng phóng viên David Halberstam tại VN của tờ New York Times thực chất đang thực hiện một chiến dịch chính trị; rằng ông Halberstam hoàn toàn không khách quan, gợi nhớ đến ông Matthews thời Castro. Kennedy tuyên bố rằng điều cần thiếtchúng ta không để cho Halberstam ảnh hưởng quá mức đến hành động của mình.(3) Ông Hilsman bảo đảm với Tổng thống Kennedy rằng sẽ không có chuyện như vậy.

5. Ông Harriman xen vào ý kiến rằng trong trường hợp này chúng ta đã hành động ngay từ cơ hội đầu tiên; rằng ở thời điểm sớm hơn, chúng ta không thể xác định chính xác nguồn sức mạnh và sự hỗ trợ.(4)

6. Tổng thống Kennedy nhận xét (5) rằng Diệm và em trai (ông Nhu), dù đáng ghét ở một số khía cạnh, đã làm rất nhiều việc theo đường lối mà chúng ta mong muốn và khi chúng ta tiến tới chỗ phải loại bỏ chính phủ này, đó không phải là kết quả từ áp lực của báo New York Times.

7. Tướng Taylor nhận thấy có nhiều khó khăn quân sự liên quan đến việc thực hiện kế hoạch nêu trong điện tín 243; rằng quân đội Việt Nam bị chia làm ba khối quyền lực; rằng ông Diệm thực sự là trọng tâmchúng ta nên đặt nỗ lực đầu tiên vào ông Diệm.

8. Ông Ball nêu lên câu hỏi liệu ông Diệm có biết em trai (ông Ngô Đình Nhu) đang làm suy yếu ông Diệm đến mức nào hay không, đưa ra ví dụ về hàng nghìn bức ảnh cá nhân của ông Diệm đã được in và trưng bày.

9. Tổng thống Kennedy kể lại rằng khoảng sáu tuần trước, ông Nhu đã có một cuộc gặp với các Tướng (6) và nêu ra câu hỏi liệu ông Nhu có đang cố gắng đích thân chiếm toàn quyền ở VN hay không. Hilsman trả lời rằng Nhu đang do dự cân nhắc. Ông tiếp tục về chủ đề Nhu bằng cách nói rằng Đô đốc Felt đã gọi cho ông, đề cập đến nhiều điện văn liên quan đến tình hình và bày tỏ lo ngại về điều gì sẽ xảy ra nếu ông bà Ngô Đình Nhu không bị tước quyền lực. Hilsman dẫn lời Đô đốc nói rằng nếu ông bà Nhu không bị tước quyền lực, các sĩ quan trung cấp của VN sẽ không còn tinh thần chiến đấu. Đô đốc Felt tin rằng các Tướng có thể giải quyết được tình hình nhưng chúng ta sẽ phải thể hiện sự sẵn lòng hỗ trợ họ. Hilsman nói rằng sau cuộc gọi này, Felt đã gọi lại cho ông và khuyên không nên trì hoãn. Ông nhắc lại, sau thắc mắc của Tướng Taylor, rằng Đô đốc Felt đã gọi ông.(7)

10. Tổng thống Kennedy hỏi Tướng Taylor, dựa trên kinh nghiệm của ông ở Ngũ Giác Đài, rằng một kế hoạch như được nêu trong Điện Văn 243 sẽ có cơ hội thành công như thế nào. Tướng Taylor trả lời rằng ở Washington, chúng ta [Hoa Kỳ] sẽ không trao vấn đề chọn nguyên thủ quốc gia cho quân đội.

11. Sau đó, ông Hilsman đặt ra câu hỏi liệu có nên khôn ngoan nếu có một tuyên bố công khai hoặc bí mật liên quan đến việc cắt giảm việc đi lại hay không. Tổng thống Kennedy đã chấp thuận một cách tiếp cận bí mật để giải quyết vấn đề, theo lời khuyên của Hilsman rằng một tuyên bố công khai theo cách nào đó có thể làm lộ ý định của chúng ta.

12. Tổng thống Kennedy hỏi Đài Tiếng nói Hoa Kỳ VOA nói gì về chủ đề này, ông Hilsman trả lời rằng hôm nay họ đã phạm sai lầm khi suy đoán về việc chính phủ Hoa Kỳ sử dụng việc cắt giảm viện trợ như một biện pháp trừng phạt chống lại chính phủ Việt Nam. Ông nói rằng điều suy đoán đó trái với hướng dẫn rõ ràng rằng Đài Tiếng nói Hoa Kỳ không nên tham gia vào việc suy đoán nào hết.

13. Ông Rusk hỏi khi nào Đại sứ Lodge dự định có buổi làm việc với Diệm. Hilsman nói, không biết gì về bất kỳ cuộc họp nào đã được lên kế hoạch.

14. Ông McNamara nói rằng, nghiên cứu về vấn đề này đã dẫn tới những câu hỏi trong đầu ông:

a. Chính xác thì chúng ta đang nói đến những Tướng nào khi đề cập đến chủ đề “nhóm sĩ quan cấp tướng”?

Về điều này, Hilsman trả lời rằng trong khi chúng tôi chỉ liên lạc được với ba Tướng (Trần Thiện Khiêm, Nguyễn Khánh và Dương Văn Minh) thì còn có những tướng khác, mặc dù ba người này từ chối nêu tên các tướng cùng ý định của họ. Ông McNamara sau đó bày tỏ quan điểm rằng chúng ta nên hỏi Sài Gòn xem chính xác những Tướng trung thành [với anh em ông Diệm và Nhu] là ai.

b. Câu hỏi thứ hai của ông là: chính xác thì chúng tôi muốn nói gì trong bản Điện Văn 243 với nhóm chữ “hỗ trợ trực tiếp” (“direct support”)?

Hilsman trả lời rằng điều này có nghĩa là tìm cách hỗ trợ quân đội Việt Nam về mặt hậu cần, không dùng Sài Gòn làm một cảng nhập cảnh.

Ông Rusk hỏi tôi [Tướng Krulak] có quen thuộc với địa lý của khu vực không, tôi trả lời khẳng định quen thuộc. Sau đó Rusk hỏi liệu tôi có tin rằng việc cung cấp hỗ trợ hậu cần trực tiếp cho lực lượng quân sự mà không sử dụng Sài Gòn làm căn cứ hậu cần là thực tế hay không. Tôi tuyên bố rằng việc này sẽ cực kỳ khó khăn, liên quan đến những thay đổi lớn trong hệ thống và thiết bị của chúng ta và sẽ cần thời gian đáng kể để phát triển một cơ chế hoàn toàn mới. Tướng Taylor tuyên bố rằng, trong mọi trường hợp, ý tưởng này chưa được quân đội Hoa Kỳ xem xét và ông ước tính đây là một dự án rất khó khăn.

Ông McNamara kết thúc cuộc thảo luận về câu hỏi này bằng cách tuyên bố rằng ông tin rằng chúng ta nên chất vấn đại diện của mình ở Sài Gòn và tìm hiểu thêm về cách giải thích của họ về yêu cầu “hỗ trợ trực tiếp” (“direct support”) hàm chứa điều gì.

c. Câu hỏi thứ ba của ông McNamara là Đại sứ Lodge sẽ nói gì với ông Diệm. Thực sự chưa bao giờ có câu trả lời cho câu hỏi này.

Tổng thống Kennedy nhận xét rằng ông không tin ông Diệm sẽ để ông Nhu bị đuổi ra khỏi hiện trường quyền lực. Bộ trưởng Rusk từ chối quan điểm này và nói rằng ông không chắc chắn về trường hợp này, trong khi ông Hilsman nói rằng các cố vấn Hoa Kỳ tại VN tin rằng hai ông Diệm và Nhu sẽ sẵn sàng cùng nhau thăng trầm.

15. Ông McNamara sau đó nêu ra câu hỏi Đại sứ Lodge tin rằng ai có thể thay thế Diệm, nói rằng nếu chúng ta đứng nhìn và để một kẻ yếu đuối lên làm Tổng thống VN thì cuối cùng chúng ta sẽ phải chịu thiệt hại. Về vấn đề này, Tổng thống Kennedy hỏi liệu Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao VN Vũ Văn Mẫu vừa mới từ chức (8) có thể là một ứng cử viên sáng giá hay không, Hilsman trả lời phủ định - nói rằng quan điểm của ông là các Tướng có lẽ sẽ ủng hộ Tướng Dương Văn Minh.

16. Bộ trưởng Rusk cho rằng có thể tồn tại với Phó Tổng Thống Nguyễn Ngọc Thơ đứng đầu, được hỗ trợ bởi chính quyền quân sự hùng mạnh.

17. Tổng thống Kennedy hỏi điều gì sẽ xảy ra nếu chúng ta phải đối mặt với việc phải sống chung với Diệm và Nhu, Hilsman trả lời rằng điều này thật kinh khủng khi suy ngẫm vì sự bất ổn nghiêm trọng về mặt cảm xúc của Nhu.

18. Ông Rusk sau đó phát biểu rằng, theo nghĩa rộng, có vẻ như trừ khi có thể thực hiện được một sự thay đổi lớn trong chính sách của Chính phủ VN, nếu không, chúng ta phải thực sự quyết định xem nên rút nguồn lực chúng ta ra khỏi VN hay phải đưa quân Mỹ vào.

19. Tổng thống Kennedy hỏi liệu chúng ta có bị đổ lỗiViệt Nam về tình hình này hay không, Hilsman trả lời rằng chúng ta có thể bị thiệt hại đôi chút nhưng hầu hết người dân VN dường như muốn loại bỏ ông bà Ngô Đình Nhu, nhưng rõ ràng cần sự hỗ trợ của Hoa Kỳ để làm như vậy. Ông nói rằng, theo những điều kiện này, chúng ta buộc phải hành động.

20. Tổng thống Kennedy tuyên bố rằng ngày mai sẽ có một cuộc họp khác để thảo luận thêm về vấn đề này. Ông McNamara tuyên bố rằng, vấn đề ưu tiên hàng đầu là chúng ta nên thu thập các bản phác thảo tiểu sử của những nhân vật chủ chốt có liên quan, sau đó Tướng Taylor gợi ý rằng chúng ta nên nói chuyện với cựu Đại sứ Nolting. Tổng thống Kennedy đồng ýtuyên bố rằng Nolting nên được đưa đến cuộc họp vào ngày mai, sau đó ông Hilsman nhận xét rằng quan điểm của Nolting có màu sắc [cảm xúc phức tạp], ở chỗ ông Nolting có liên quan đến cảm xúc trong tình huống này. Khi nghe điều này, Tổng thống nhận xét, "Có lẽ đúng vậy."

21. Sau đó, Tổng thống Kennedy tuyên bố rằng các vấn đề được thảo luận trong phòng cần được giữ bí mật và nhóm cần biết phải được giữ ở số lượng tối thiểu.

V.H. Krulak

Thiếu tướng, USMC

GHI CHÚ:

(1) Nguồn: Đại học Quốc phòng, Taylor Papers, Việt Nam, chương. XXIII. Bí mật hàng đầu; Nhạy cảm. Được soạn thảo bởi Krulak. Cuộc gặp được tổ chức tại Bạch Ốc. Một bản ghi nhớ cuộc trò chuyện về cuộc họp này của Hilsman có trong Thư viện Kennedy, Hilsman Papers, Các quốc gia, Việt Nam, Các cuộc họp tại Bạch Ốc, các Hội đồng Nhà nước.

(2) Văn bản 281.

(3) Trong biên bản cuộc họp của Hilsman, ông ghi lời Tổng thống Kennedy như sau: “Phóng viên Halberstam là một đứa con nít mới 28 tuổi và Tổng thống Kennedy muốn có sự đảm bảo rằng đừng để ý kiến Halberstam ảnh hưởng trong quyết định của chúng tôi.”

(4) Trong biên bản cuộc họp của Hilsman, ông đã tường thuật lại những quan sát của Harriman như sau: “Ông Harriman đã chỉ ra rằng quyết định được đưa ra vào thời điểm sớm nhất có thể có thể được; Thứ Bảy [24 tháng 8] là ngày đầu tiên chúng tôi biết được tình hình và không thể đưa ra quyết định nào như vậy trừ khi người dân Việt Nam phẫn nộ chống lại chính phủ; tức là, hành động đập phá các Chùa đã khiến người dân chống lại chế độ và chúng tôi đã đưa ra quyết định của mình vào thời điểm sớm nhất có thể sau hành động đó.”

(5) Biên bản của Hilsman về những nhận xét của Tổng thống Kennedy vào thời điểm này viết: “Tổng thống hỏi một số câu hỏi về tính cách và mối quan hệ giữa TRần Thiện Khiêm, Nguyễn Khánh, Dương Văn Minh, Ngô Đình Nhu, Trần Văn Đôn, v.v. Sức mạnh tương đối của các lực lượng khác nhau ở Sài Gòn cũng được thảo luận - có ấn tượng rằng Lực lượng đặc biệt của Đại tá Lê Quang Tung là quân đội duy nhất hiện có mặt ở Sài Gòn ngoại trừ một số tiểu đoàn Thủy quân lục chiến trên thực tế có thể trung thành với Nhu.

(6) Xem Văn bản 220.

(7) Trong hồ sơ của Hilsman, ông này nhận xét: “Maxwell Taylor rõ ràng rất bực dọc khi Felt trước đó đã gọi cho Hilsman, và tôi chắc chắn rằng Felt sẽ biết về điều đó.” Trong bức điện tín 2219 của JCS, ngày 26 tháng 8, Taylor đã hỏi Felt rằng liệu lời kể của Hilsman về những cuộc trò chuyện qua điện thoại này có chính xác hay không. (Đại học Quốc phòng, Taylor Papers, Việt Nam, chương XXIII) Trong điện tín CINCPAC 262317, ngày 27 tháng 8, Felt trả lời rằng ông đã thực hiện hai cuộc gọi tới Hilsman vào ngày 24 tháng 8. Trong lần đầu tiên ông đề nghị Hoa Kỳ ủng hộ hành động của các Tướng chống lại Nhu; trong phần thứ hai, Felt nói rằng anh ta không khuyên chống lại sự chậm trễ mà chỉ yêu cầu được đưa vào với tư cách là người nhận thông tin về các bức điện thích hợp về câu hỏi này. (Ibid., T-172-69) Trong điện tín JCS 2253, ngày 27 tháng 8, Taylor thay mặt các Tham mưu trưởng liên quân khiển trách Felt vì đã bày tỏ quan điểm của mình về một vấn đề quan trọng bên ngoài các kênh thích hợp. (Sđd.)

(8) Vũ Văn Mẫu.

 

.... o ....

 


Gủi hàng từ MỸ về VIỆT NAM
Gủi hàng từ MỸ về VIỆT NAM
Tạo bài viết
24/08/2015(Xem: 10780)
Thời Phật giáo xuống đường vào những năm 1960, anh Cao Huy Thuần là một nhà làm báo mà tôi chỉ là một đoàn sinh GĐPT đi phát báo. Thuở ấy, tờ LẬP TRƯỜNG như một tiếng kèn xông xáo trong mặt trận văn chương và xã hội của khuynh hướng Phật giáo dấn thân, tôi mê nhất là mục Chén Thuốc Đắng của Ba Cao do chính anh Thuần phụ trách. Đó là mục chính luận sắc bén nhất của tờ báo dưới hình thức phiếm luận hoạt kê. Rồi thời gian qua đi, anh Thuần sang Pháp và ở luôn bên đó. Đạo pháp và thế sự thăng trầm..
Nguồn tin của Báo Giác Ngộ từ quý Thầy tại Phật đường Khuông Việt và gia đình cho biết Giáo sư Cao Huy Thuần, một trí thức, Phật tử thuần thành, vừa trút hơi thở cuối cùng xả bỏ huyễn thân vào lúc 23 giờ 26 phút ngày 7-7-2024 (nhằm mùng 2-6-Giáp Thìn), tại Pháp.
"Chỉ có hai ngày trong năm là không thể làm được gì. Một ngày gọi là ngày hôm qua và một ngày kia gọi là ngày mai. Ngày hôm nay mới chính là ngày để tin, yêu và sống trọn vẹn. (Đức Đạt Lai Lạt Ma 14)