Bilingual. 221. Ambassador Lodge met with President of the Republic of Vietnam Ngô Đình Diệm. Diem said that he supposed I knew that Tri Quang had been communicating with the outside world and that he had dropped some papers out the window onto the street.

08/06/20244:13 SA(Xem: 610)
Bilingual. 221. Ambassador Lodge met with President of the Republic of Vietnam Ngô Đình Diệm. Diem said that he supposed I knew that Tri Quang had been communicating with the outside world and that he had dropped some papers out the window onto the street.

blank
Bilingual. 221. Ambassador Lodge met with President of the Republic of Vietnam Ngô Đình Diệm. Diem said that he supposed I knew that Tri Quang had been communicating with the outside world and that he had dropped some papers out the window onto the street. I said that I found this hard to believe because there were no windows in the room in which he was living and even if he went along the gallery to go to the men’s room, he still was nowhere near the street. He said that the schools had been gradually opened, that they were all open in Hue, that the Buddhists were being liberated and that changing Decree Law 10 was very complicated and up to the Assembly, that he had no authority. I said many things happen which made it hard for us. In our newspapers we read of newspapermen being beaten up (as they were on October 5); of bonzes burning; of children being taken off to concentration points in US trucks. Diem talked about the impropriety of our allowing former Ambassador Chuong to speak. I said there was free speech in America and anybody could say whatever he wanted. He said that Ambassador Chuong’s older daughter in Washington was “acting like a prostitute”, that she “scandalized Georgetown” and “even jumped on priests”. To this I made no comment.//Đại sứ Lodge gặp Tổng Thống VNCH Ngô Đình Diệm. Diệm nói rằng Diệm đoán tôi biết Trí Quang đang giao tiếp với thế giới bên ngoài Trí Quang đã phóng ra một số giấy tờ qua cửa sổ [tòa đại sứ Mỹ] xuống đường phố. Tôi nói rằng tôi thấy điều này thật khó tin vì căn phòng Trí Quang đang ở không có cửa sổ và ngay cả khi Trí Quang đi dọc hành lang để đến phòng vệ sinh nam, Trí Quang vẫn không ở gần đường phố. Diệm nói rằng các trường học đã được mở dần dần, ở Huế tất cả đều được mở, Phật tử đang được thả ra tù và việc thay đổi Đạo dụ số 10 rất phức tạp và sẽ tùy Quốc hội, vì Diệm không có thẩm quyền. Tôi đã nói có nhiều chuyện xảy ra khiến chúng ta khó khăn. Trên báo chí của chúng ta, chúng ta đọc thấy các phóng viên bị đánh đập (như vào ngày 5 tháng 10);(2) việc các nhà sư tự thiêu; các vị thành niên bị bắt bớ đến các trại tập trung trên xe tải của Mỹ. Diệm chuyển chủ đề và nói về việc chúng ta cho phép cựu Đại sứ Trần Văn Chương (thân phụ của bà Nhu) phát biểu là không đúng đắn. Tôi đã nói ở Mỹ có quyền tự do ngôn luận và bất cứ ai cũng có thể nói bất cứ điều gì mình muốn. 
Diệm nói rằng Trưởng nữ [Trần Lệ Chi, chị của bà Nhu] của Đại sứ Trần Văn Chương ở Washington đã “hành động như một cô gái điếm”, rằng cô ấy đã “gây tai tiếng cho Georgetown” và “thậm chí còn tấn công các linh mục”. Về điều này tôi không bình luận gì.

us-embassy-saigon-vietnam_200-2221. Telegram From the Embassy in Vietnam to the Department of State(1)

 

Saigon, October 28, 1963, 9 p.m

805. Eyes only Secretary. Bangkok exclusive for Felt.

1. Herewith report of my day with President Diem, Sunday, October 27.

2. We left Saigon [garble—and flew?] to Phuoc Long from where we flew for about 20 minutes by helicopter to Dao Nghia Plantation Center where we had lunch. We then flew over the Province of Quang Duc to Dalat. Diem was at his best, describing the public improvements that he had put into effect. He was constantly saying, “I did this” and “I did that”. He appears deeply interested in agriculture and in developing the country. When we were in the helicopter, because of the noise, he was continually writing messages on a large block of paper describing what we were seeing. He is very likeable. One feels that he is a nice, good man who living a good life by his own lights, but who also feels that he is a man who is cut off from present, who is living in the past, who is truly indifferent to people as such and who is simply unbelievably stubborn.

3. After leaving Saigon, the President mentioned the fact that at one time UNESCO had planned to build another university in Vietnam. This gave me an opportunity to discuss the UN Commission. I asked him whether he had seen them. Diem said that he had. I said that I knew two members of it well and one slightly. I was sure that at least one of them was going to ask me to let him talk with Tri Quang. I said that my answer would be that I would not allow anyone to see Tri Quang without the request of the Government of Vietnam, but I strongly advised him to give his permission because it would help Vietnam in the United Nations if the Commission could say that he had at no time prevented them from seeing anything or talking to anybody whom they wanted. He said nothing but looked provoked. [Page 443]After a pause, he said that he supposed I knew that Tri Quang had been communicating with the outside world and that he had dropped some papers out the window onto the street. I said that I found this hard to believe because there were no windows in the room in which he was living and even if he went along the gallery to go to the men’s room, he still was nowhere near the street.

4. After a sumptuous Vietnamese dinner, he suddenly stopped talking about the events of the past and said, in a casual rather supercilious tone, that he would like to know whether we were going to suspend the commercial imports payments or whether we were going to stop. He said it as though it were a matter of indifference to him. I had at no time brought this up or done anything to make it easy for him to do so.

5. I said I did not know, but asked what he intended to do if our policy did change. Would he open the schools, would he liberate the Buddhists and others who were in prison, would he eliminate the discriminatory features of Decree Law Number 10?

6. He said that the schools had been gradually opened, that they were all open in Hue, that the Buddhists were being liberated and that changing Decree Law 10 was very complicated and up to the Assembly, that he had no authority.

7. He then attacked American activities in Vietnam. He spoke particularly about an American [less than 1 line not declassified] who had talked to people in the Vietnamese Government about threats which had been made to assassinate me and that the 7th Fleet would come in if such a thing happened. He said that Communist documents had also been found discussing a coup on October 23 and 24 which also involved the 7th Fleet. He said that the assassination story had been started to poison my mind, that anyone who knew him knew that my safety was an essential preoccupation of his. I said I had total confidence that he did not want me to be assassinated, but that these rumors were constantly being brought to me. I also pointed out that there had been no coup on October 23 and 24.

8. He said that Mecklin, the head of USIS, was printing tracts against the government and giving equipment to opponents of the government so that they could print tracts and that the CIA was intriguing against the GVN.

9. I said: Give me proof of improper action by any employee of the US Government and I will see that he leaves Vietnam.

10. He then said that we must get on with the war against the Communists.

11. I said I agreed but we must consider US opinion; we wanted to be treated as equal partners; we do not want Vietnam to be a satellite of ours; nor do we want to be a satellite of Vietnam’s. We do not wish to be put in the extremely embarrassing position of condoning totalitarian acts which are against our traditions and ideals. Repeatedly I asked him: What do you propose to do for us? His reply several times was either a blank stare or change of subject or the statement: “je ne vais pas servir”, which makes no sense. He must have meant to say “ceder” rather than “servir”, meaning: “I will not give in.” He warned that the Vietnamese people were strange people and could do odd things if they were resentful.

12. I said many things happen which made it hard for us. In our newspapers we read of newspapermen being beaten up (as they were on October 5);(2) of bonzes burning; of children being taken off to concentration points in US trucks.

13. He said newspapermen shouldn’t go into the center of a riot, they could expect to get beaten.

14. I said you don’t get anywhere in the US by beating up newspapermen. He said I will not give in.

15. I said you wanted us to do something for you, what can you do for us? Ours is a government of public opinion. Public opinion is already so critical that I thought that if the Church resolution came to a vote there would be too many votes against Vietnam. I was glad that it was arranged to leave the decision on aid to Vietnam up to the President. But the President himself could not fly in the face of a totally adverse public opinion and the bad publicity coming out of Vietnam could make it hard for the President.

16. He said the US press is full of lies. He then changed the subject and talked about the impropriety of our allowing former Ambassador Chuong to speak.

17. I said there was free speech in America and anybody could say whatever he wanted.

18. He said there was a practice against letting a former Ambassador attack his own country in the country in which he had been Ambassador. This is clearly something for which Vietnam could be indemnified (edomommageable).

19. He then spoke about brother Nhu who he said was so good and so quiet, so conciliatory and so compromising.

20. I said I would not debate this point and it might be that Mr. Nhu had been treated unfairly in the press of the world but a fact is a fact and the fact is that Mr. and Mrs. Nhu have had extremely bad publicity. This is why I had advised a period of silence for both of them. It is still hard for me to understand why Mrs. Nhu felt she had to talk so much.

21. He said she had had more than 100 invitations.

22. I said yes, but they had not come from the US Government.

23. He said the press does not print what Madame Nhu says. The whole concert of lies is orchestrated by the State Department.

24. I said the government does not control the press in America. It is basically a free commercial press. When there is something sensational to report, an American newspaper is going to report it or else it will cease to be a newspaper. The way to stop the publicity is for Madame Nhu to stop talking.

25. He said that Ambassador Chuong’s older daughter in Washington was “acting like a prostitute”, that she “scandalized Georgetown” and “even jumped on priests”. To this I made no comment.

26. Somewhat to my surprise he brought up the Times of Vietnam (which I had not done) and said that he realized that perhaps it had been a little bit inaccurate concerning the departure of Rufus Phillips which he understood was in fact due to the fact that his father was sick. I said that I was sure Phillips’ father was sick, but I also said that the Times of Vietnam was constantly slandering the US, printing things which were totally untrue, such as the story the other day that [the Embassy?] allowed the American Congressional delegation and Secretary McNamara to visit Tri Quang. Neither of these things were true. But here again he would never admit any of my statements about the inaccuracy of the Times of Vietnam concerning the US.

27. At the end of the conversation he said with a sigh I realize I made a great mistake in leaving such a gap in Washington, meaning that if he had had another kind of Ambassador, the press and the politicians could have been cultivated so that Vietnam would not now find itself with such unfavorable public opinion.

28. When it was evident that the conversation was practically over, I said: Mr. President, every single specific suggestion which I have made, you have rejected. Isn’t there some one thing you may think of that is within your capabilities to do and that would favorably impress US opinion. As on other previous occasions when I asked him similar questions, he gave me a blank look and changed the subject.

29. Although the conversation was frustrating and long-drawnout, the tone was always courteous and restrained. I am convinced that we have persuaded him of one thing: That the state of US opinion is very bad from his viewpoint. For a man who is as cut off as he is, this is something. Perhaps the conversation will give him food for thought and perhaps the conversation marks a beginning. But taken by itself, if does not offer much hope that it is going to change.

30. The US Government should, however, make up its mind as to what it would regard as an adequate action by the GVN on which to base a resumption of commercial imports. Thuan thinks we will be hearing from him again.

Lodge

NOTES:

(1) Source: Department of State, Central Files, POL 8 S VIET-US. Secret; Priority. Also sent to Bangkok. Received at 12:48 p.m. and passed to the White House, CIA, and Office of the Secretary of Defense.↩

(2) While covering an act of self-immolation by a Buddhist bonze at the circle in front of the Saigon Market, three American news correspondents, John Starkey and Grant Wolfhill of NBC and David Halberstam of The New York Times, were attacked and beaten by plainclothes Vietnamese policemen who sought to prevent them from taking photographs of the suicide. (Telegram 637 from Saigon, October 5; ibid., SOC 14-1 S VIET) See also Mecklin, Mission in Torment, pp. 242-243.↩

Source:

https://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1961-63v04/d221

 

.... o ....

 

221. Điện tín từ Đại sứ quán Hoa Kỳ tại VN gửi về Bộ Ngoại giao(1)

 

Sài Gòn, ngày 28 tháng 10 năm 1963, lúc 9 giờ tối.

805. Chỉ để Bộ Trưởng Ngoại Giao Dean Rusk đọc. Tới Bangkok gửi riêng cho Đô Đốc Harry Felt.

1. Dưới đây là báo cáo về ngày làm việc của tôi với Tổng thống Diệm, Chủ nhật, ngày 27 tháng 10.

2. Chúng tôi rời Sài Gòn [cắt xén—và đã bay?] đến Phước Long từ đó chúng tôi bay khoảng 20 phút bằng trực thăng đến Trung tâm đồn điền Đạo Nghĩa nơi chúng tôi ăn trưa. Sau đó chúng tôi bay qua tỉnh Quảng Đức để đến Đà Lạt. Diệm đã trình bày những cải thiện công cộng mà ông đã thực hiện. Diệm liên tục nói: “Tôi đã làm điều này” và “Tôi đã làm điều đó”. Ông tỏ ra quan tâm sâu sắc đến nông nghiệp và phát triển đất nước. Khi chúng tôi ở trên trực thăng, vì tiếng ồn, Diệm liên tục viết những dòng chữ lên một tờ giấy lớn mô tả những gì chúng tôi đang nhìn thấy. Diệm rất dễ mến. Người ta cảm thấy Diệm là một người đàn ông tốt bụng, tử tế, sống một cuộc sống tốt đẹp theo cách riêng của mình, nhưng cũng có cảm giác rằng Diệm là một người xa cách với hiện thực, sống trong quá khứ, thực sự thờ ơ với mọi người, và ai chỉ đơn giảnngoan cố đến mức không thể tin được.

3. Sau khi rời Sài Gòn, Diệm đề cập đến việc đã có lúc UNESCO dự định xây dựng một trường đại học khác ở Việt Nam. Điều này đã cho tôi cơ hội để thảo luận về Ủy ban Liên Hợp Quốc. Tôi hỏi Diệm liệu Diệm có đã gặp họ [Ủy ban LHQ] không. Diệm nói là có. Tôi nói rằng tôi biết rõ hai thành viên trong đó và một người một chút. Tôi tin chắc rằng ít nhất một người trong số họ đã xin tôi cho anh ta nói chuyện với nhà sư Thích Trí Quang. Tôi nói rằng câu trả lời của tôi là tôi sẽ không cho phép bất kỳ ai gặp Trí Quang nếu khôngyêu cầu của Chính phủ VNCH, nhưng tôi hết sức khuyên Diệm nên cho phép vì điều đó sẽ giúp ích cho VNCH tại LHQ nếu Ủy ban có thể nói rằng Diệm chưa bao giờ ngăn cản họ gặp hoặc nói chuyện với bất kỳ ai mà họ muốn. Diệm không nói gì mà có vẻ bị kích động. Ngừng một lúc, Diệm nói rằng Diệm đoán tôi biết Trí Quang đang giao tiếp với thế giới bên ngoài và Trí Quang đã phóng ra một số giấy tờ qua cửa sổ [tòa đại sứ Mỹ] xuống đường phố. Tôi nói rằng tôi thấy điều này thật khó tin vì căn phòng Trí Quang đang ở không có cửa sổ và ngay cả khi Trí Quang đi dọc hành lang để đến phòng vệ sinh nam, Trí Quang vẫn không ở gần đường phố.

4. Sau bữa tối thịnh soạn ẩm thực Việt Nam, Diệm đột nhiên ngừng nói về những sự kiện trong quá khứ và nói, với một giọng điệu khá tự nhiên, rằng Diệm muốn biết liệu chúng ta sẽ tạm dừng tiền chi trả nhập khẩu thương mại hay liệu chúng ta sẽ chận lại. Diệm nói như thể đó là một vấn đề thờ ơ đối với Diệm. Tôi chưa bao giờ nhắc đến chuyện này hay làm bất cứ điều gì để giúp Diệm làm điều đó dễ dàng.

5. Tôi nói tôi không biết nhưng hỏi Diệm dự định sẽ làm gì nếu chính sách của chúng ta thay đổi. Liệu Ngài có mở lại trường học, liệu Ngài có mở cửa tù để thả các Phật tử và những người đang bị giam, liệu Ngài có xóa bỏ những kỳ thị tôn giáo trong Đạo dụ số 10?

6. Diệm nói rằng các trường học đã được mở dần dần, ở Huế tất cả đều được mở, Phật tử đang được thả ra tù và việc thay đổi Đạo dụ số 10 rất phức tạp và sẽ tùy Quốc hội, vì Diệm không có thẩm quyền.

7. Sau đó Diệm tấn công các hoạt động của Mỹ ở Việt Nam. Diệm đặc biệt nói về một người Mỹ [chưa đến 1 dòng không được giải mật] đã nói chuyện với những người trong Chính phủ VNCH về những lời đe dọa ám sát tôi [Lodge] và rằng Hạm đội 7 sẽ vào VN nếu điều đó xảy ra. Ông nói rằng người ta cũng tìm thấy các tài liệu của Cộng sản thảo luận về cuộc đảo chính vào ngày 23 và 24 tháng 10 cũng có sự tham gia của Hạm đội 7. Diệm nói rằng câu chuyện ám sát đã bắt đầu đầu độc tâm trí tôi, rằng bất cứ ai biết Diệm đều biết rằng sự an toàn của tôi [Lodge] là mối bận tâm thiết yếu của Diệm. Tôi nói rằng tôi hoàn toàn tin tưởng rằng Diệm không muốn tôi bị ám sát, nhưng những tin đồn này liên tục được đưa đến với tôi. Tôi cũng chỉ ra rằng không có cuộc đảo chính nào vào ngày 23 và 24 tháng 10.

8. Diệm nói rằng Mecklin, người đứng đầu Phòng Thông Tin Hoa Kỳ USIS, đã in các tờ báo chống lại chính phủ và cung cấp thiết bị cho những người chống đối chính phủ để họ có thể in các tờ báo và rằng CIA đang âm mưu chống lại Chính phủ VNCH.

9. Tôi nói: Hãy cho tôi bằng chứng về hành động không đúng đắn của bất kỳ nhân viên nào của Chính phủ Hoa Kỳ và tôi sẽ bắt anh ta rời khỏi Việt Nam.

10. Sau đó Diệm nói rằng chúng ta phải tiếp tục cuộc chiến chống Cộng sản.

11. Tôi đã nói là đồng ý nhưng phải xem xét ý kiến ​​của phía Mỹ nữa; chúng ta muốn được đối xử như những đối tác bình đẳng; chúng ta không muốn Việt Nam là vệ tinh của chúng ta; chúng ta cũng không muốn làm vệ tinh của Việt Nam. Chúng ta không muốn bị đặt vào tình thế cực kỳ xấu hổ khi dung túng những hành động toàn trị [của Diệm và Nhu] đi ngược lại truyền thốnglý tưởng của chúng ta. Tôi nhiều lần hỏi Diệm: Ngài định làm gì cho chúng tôi? Câu trả lời của Diệm nhiều lần là một cái nhìn trống rỗng hoặc thay đổi chủ đề hoặc câu nói: “je ne vais pas servir” (Tôi sẽ không phục vụ), điều này vô nghĩa. Chắc hẳn anh ta muốn nói “ceder” chứ không phải “servir”, nghĩa là: “Tôi sẽ không nhượng bộ.” Diệm cảnh báo rằng người dân Việt Nam là những con người kỳ lạ và có thể làm những điều kỳ quặc nếu họ phẫn uất.

12. Tôi đã nói có nhiều chuyện xảy ra khiến chúng ta khó khăn. Trên báo chí của chúng ta, chúng ta đọc thấy các phóng viên bị đánh đập (như vào ngày 5 tháng 10);(2) việc các nhà sư tự thiêu; các vị thành niên bị bắt bớ đến các trại tập trung trên xe tải của Mỹ.

13. Diệm nói các nhà báo không nên đi vào giữa một cuộc biểu tình bạo loạn, họ có thể bị đánh.

14. Tôi đã nói rằng Ngài sẽ không đi thuyết phục được gì ở Mỹ bằng cách hành hung các nhà báo. Diệm nói tôi sẽ không nhượng bộ.

15. Tôi nói ngài muốn chúng tôi làm gì đó cho ngài, thì ngài có thể làm gì cho chúng tôi? Chúng ta là một chính phủ của dư luận. Dư luận đã phê phán đến mức tôi nghĩ nếu nghị quyết của Thượng nghị sĩ Frank Church được đưa ra biểu quyết thì sẽ có quá nhiều phiếu chống Việt Nam. Tôi rất vui vì đã có sự sắp xếp để Tổng thống Kennedy quyết định viện trợ cho Việt Nam. Nhưng bản thân Tổng thống Kennedy cũng không thể đối mặt với dư luận hoàn toàn bất lợidư luận xấu từ Việt Nam có thể gây khó khăn cho Tổng thống Kennedy.

16. Diệm cho rằng báo chí Mỹ đầy dối trá. Sau đó Diệm chuyển chủ đề và nói về việc chúng ta cho phép cựu Đại sứ Trần Văn Chương (thân phụ của bà Nhu) phát biểu là không đúng đắn.

17. Tôi đã nói ở Mỹ có quyền tự do ngôn luận và bất cứ ai cũng có thể nói bất cứ điều gì mình muốn.

18. Diệm nói rằng có một thực tế chống lại việc để một cựu Đại sứ tấn công đất nước của mình ở quốc gia mà Chương từng là Đại sứ. Đây rõ ràng là điều mà Việt Nam có thể được bồi thường (edomommageable).

19. Sau đó Diệm nói về Ngô Đình Nhu, người mà Diệm cho là rất tốt và rất trầm lặng, rất hòa giải và rất thỏa hiệp.

20. Tôi đã nói là tôi sẽ không tranh luận điểm này và có thể ông Nhu đã bị báo chí thế giới đối xử bất công nhưng sự thậtsự thậtsự thật là ông bà Nhu đã bị dư luận cực kỳ xấu. Đây là lý do tại sao tôi đã khuyên cả hai ông bà Nhu nên im lặng một thời gian. Tôi vẫn khó hiểu tại sao bà Nhu lại cảm thấy phải nói nhiều như vậy.

21. Diệm nói bà Nhu đã nhận được hơn 100 lời mời [nói chuyện].

22. Tôi nói đúng thế, nhưng chúng không đến từ Chính phủ Hoa Kỳ.

23. Diệm nói báo chí không in những gì bà Nhu nói. Toàn bộ các dàn hòa tấu dối trá được dàn dựng bởi Bộ Ngoại giao Hoa Kỳ.

24. Tôi đã nói là chính phủ không kiểm soát báo chí ở Mỹ. Về cơ bản nó là một nền báo chí thương mại tự do. Khi có điều gì đó giật gân để đưa tin, một tờ báo Mỹ sẽ đưa tin đó nếu không nó sẽ không còn là một tờ báo nữa. Cách ngăn chặn dư luận là bà Nhu đừng nói nữa.

25. Diệm nói rằng Trưởng nữ [Trần Lệ Chi, chị của bà Nhu] của Đại sứ Trần Văn Chương ở Washington đã “hành động như một cô gái điếm”, rằng cô ấy đã “gây tai tiếng cho Georgetown” và “thậm chí còn tấn công các linh mục”. Về điều này tôi không bình luận gì.

26. Tôi hơi ngạc nhiên khi Diệm nhắc đến báo Times of Vietnam (điều mà tôi chưa làm) và nói rằng Diệm nhận ra rằng có lẽ có một chút không chính xác về sự ra đi của Rufus Phillips mà Diệm hiểu rằng trên thực tế là do thực tế rằng bố của Phillips bị bệnh. Tôi nói tôi chắc chắn bố Phillips bị bệnh, nhưng tôi cũng nói rằng báo Times of Vietnam liên tục vu khống Mỹ, in những điều hoàn toàn sai sự thật, chẳng hạn như câu chuyện hôm nọ [Đại sứ quán?] cho phép người Phái đoàn Quốc hội Mỹ và Bộ Trưởng Quốc Phòng Mỹ McNamara tới thăm nhà sư Trí Quang. Cả hai điều này đều không đúng sự thật. Nhưng ở đây một lần nữa Diệm sẽ không bao giờ thừa nhận bất kỳ phát biểu nào của tôi về sự thiếu chính xác của báo Times of Vietnam liên quan đến Mỹ.

27. Kết thúc cuộc trò chuyện, Diệm nói với một tiếng thở dài. Diệm nói đã nhận ra mình đã mắc sai lầm lớn khi để lại một khoảng trống như vậy ở Washington, nghĩa là nếu Diệm có một loại Đại sứ khác thì báo chí và các chính trị gia [ở Mỹ] đã có thể được nhồi nắn để Bây giờ Việt Nam sẽ không gặp phải dư luận bất lợi như vậy.

28. Khi thấy rõ cuộc trò chuyện gần như đã kết thúc, tôi nói: Thưa Tổng thống, mọi đề nghị cụ thể mà tôi đưa ra đều bị ngài bác bỏ. Không có điều gì ngài có thể nghĩ là nằm trong khả năng của ngài để làm và điều đó sẽ gây ấn tượng tốt với dư luận Hoa Kỳ. Như những lần trước khi tôi hỏi Diệm những câu hỏi tương tự, Diệm nhìn tôi ngơ ngác và chuyển chủ đề.

29. Mặc dù cuộc trò chuyện có vẻ bực bội và kéo dài nhưng giọng điệu luôn nhã nhặnkiềm chế. Tôi tin chắc rằng chúng tôi đã thuyết phục được ông Diệm một điều: rằng quan điểm của Mỹ là rất tồi tệ theo quan điểm của ông ấy. Đối với một người đàn ông bị cô lập như Diệm, đây là một điều gì đó. Có lẽ cuộc trò chuyện sẽ mang lại cho Diệm nhiều điều để suy ngẫm và có lẽ cuộc trò chuyện đánh dấu một sự khởi đầu. Nhưng nếu xét riêng thì không mang lại nhiều hy vọng rằng nó sẽ thay đổi.

30. Tuy nhiên, Chính phủ Hoa Kỳ nên quyết định xem Chính phủ VNCH sẽ có hành động thích hợp nào để làm cơ sở cho việc nối lại nhập khẩu thương mại. Bộ trưởng Nguyễn Đình Thuần nghĩ rằng chúng tôi sẽ lại được nghe tin tức từ Diệm.

Lodge

(Đại sứ Hoa Kỳ tại Việt Nam)

GHI CHÚ:

(1) Nguồn: Bộ Ngoại giao, Central Files, POL 8 S VIET-US. Bí mật; Ưu tiên. Cũng được gửi đến Bangkok (tới Đô Đốc Harry Felt). Nhận được lúc 12:48 giờ chiều. và được chuyển đến Bạch Ốc, CIA và Văn phòng Bộ trưởng Quốc phòng.↩

(2) Khi đang đưa tin về vụ tự thiêu của một vị sư Phật giáo tại bùng binh trước Chợ Sài Gòn, ba phóng viên người Mỹ là John Starkey và Grant Wolfhill của NBC và David Halberstam của The New York Times đã bị tấn công, đánh đập bởi cảnh sát thường phục Việt Nam đã ngăn cản họ chụp ảnh vụ tự thiêu. (Telegram 637 từ Sài Gòn, ngày 5 tháng 10; ibid., SOC 14-1 S viet) Xem thêm sách của John Mecklin, nhan đề "Mission in Torment" trang 242-243.↩

.

Kho sử liệu PHẬT GIÁO VIỆT NAM 1963 - SONG NGỮ:

https://thuvienhoasen.org/a39405/phat-giao-viet-nam-1963-song-ngu

 

 

 

Gủi hàng từ MỸ về VIỆT NAM
Gủi hàng từ MỸ về VIỆT NAM
Tạo bài viết
24/08/2015(Xem: 10676)
Sư Thích Minh Tuệ, người thực hiện cuộc đi bộ khất thực khắp Việt Nam, đã trở thành một hiện tượng thu hút sự chú ý của đông đảo dư luận. Giờ đây, dù ông buộc phải dừng bước giữa chừng nhưng những ảnh hưởng của ông vẫn còn lan tỏa. Mới đây, Thượng tọa Thích Minh Đạo, trụ trì Tu viện Minh Đạo ở thị xã Phú Mỹ, tỉnh Bà Rịa-Vũng Tàu, bị giáo hội Phật giáo ở địa phương yêu cầu làm kiểm điểm sau khi "tán thán" sư Thích Minh Tuệ.
Điều quan trọng nhất: Tu sĩ Minh Tuệ đã làm xong nhiệm vụ, đem 6 năm khổ tu dồn lại mấy tuần, đem chính thân mạng của mình để minh họa lại hình ảnh và đạo hạnh của một nhà tu theo Phật:… là như thế đó. Phật tử và quần chúng cả nước và khắp năm châu ít nhất cũng có một khái niệm về hình ảnh và phẩm chất tối thắng của một người tu theo Phật giáo chân chính căn bản là như thế nào. Tuyệt nhiên không phải là những màn múa may thời mạt pháp với nhữg Tăng (ông), Ni (bà) đang lợi dụng một đạo Phật thậm thâm vi diệu thành hí trường gây quỹ hay môi trường kinh doanh trục lợi trên sự nhẹ dạ vô tâm của quần chúng Phật tử đang phủ phục cúng dường!